Brake Fluid - Which brand do we have? - Chrysler 300C Forum: 300C & SRT8 Forums
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post #1 of 13 (permalink) Old 04-13-2007, 11:04 AM Thread Starter
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Brake Fluid - Which brand do we have?

I have a track event coming up and my race car buddy says that the club requires you to have a brake fluid that can withstand heat of 500 degrees. Do we know what brake fluid Mopar dealers put in our SRT's? Also, he recommended switching to Castrol Syn fluid. Is that safe for our cars? Thanks.

Haywood

Former SRT-8 Owner

2008 BMW 135i Coupe
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post #2 of 13 (permalink) Old 04-13-2007, 03:50 PM
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I'm not familiar with Castrol Syn brake fluid, but I don't think it really matters what the brand is. There are basically 3 types of brake fluid; DOT 3, DOT 4, and DOT 5 Silicone. (DOT stands for Department of Transportation). DOT 3 and DOT 4 are compatible with each other and can be mixed, but DOT 4 has a higher boiling point. I do not know the actual tempuratures of each, I apologize. The master cylinder cap should say what Chrysler recommends for the SRT (and what's in there from the factory).

DOT 5 Silicone brake fluid is NOT compatible with the other 2 kinds, and CANNOT be used with ABS brake systems. It is primarily used in street rods and classic cars that get driven very little, since it will not absorb water like regular brake fluid does. It also will not damage paint if spilled. But again you CANNOT use DOT 5 silicone due to the ABS brakes.

Last edited by kevenj; 04-13-2007 at 03:51 PM.
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post #3 of 13 (permalink) Old 04-13-2007, 05:44 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks, Kevin!

Anyone else know the brand Mopar uses and the boiling point?

Sorry, it's Castrol SRF. I guess this is the best stuff.

Castrol SRF is an ultra high performance brake fluid, specifically formulated for competitive motorsport where extreme braking conditions are encountered. Its unique and patented formulation gives an exceptionally high dry boiling point and it has superb anti-vapour lock properties to ensure consistent performance, even under the most arduous racing conditions. SRF is used in Formula One, Indy Car and Sports Car Racing. Available by the litre.

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post #4 of 13 (permalink) Old 04-14-2007, 01:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Haywood View Post
Thanks, Kevin!

Anyone else know the brand Mopar uses and the boiling point?

Sorry, it's Castrol SRF. I guess this is the best stuff.

Castrol SRF is an ultra high performance brake fluid, specifically formulated for competitive motorsport where extreme braking conditions are encountered. Its unique and patented formulation gives an exceptionally high dry boiling point and it has superb anti-vapour lock properties to ensure consistent performance, even under the most arduous racing conditions. SRF is used in Formula One, Indy Car and Sports Car Racing. Available by the litre.
Castrol SRF is crazy expensive, at about $80/liter. If you're going to use a real racing fluid, Motul RBF600 is much cheaper. It has a dry boiling point slightly higher than Castrol SRF at 593 degrees F. Castrol SRF's claim to fame is the high wet boiling point. But as long as your fluid is installed soon before the track day, you'll be just fine.

Valvoline SynPower DOT 4 has a dry boiling point of 503 degrees F, so it's the minimum performance fluid you'll be able to get away with, according to the rules of that particular club. See: SynPower Spec Sheet. This stuff is cheap and available just about everywhere

If you can find it, ATE TYP200 (same as ATE Super Blue Racing, but without the blue dye) offers a higher dry boiling point of 536 degrees F, while still being reasonably priced. This is what I use in all my street cars. Fine for street and track, unless you're running in the Advanced or Instructor run groups and using R-compound racing tires. For heavy track, I use Motul RBF600.

Dave Zeckhausen
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post #5 of 13 (permalink) Old 04-16-2007, 02:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DZeckhausen View Post
Castrol SRF is crazy expensive, at about $80/liter. If you're going to use a real racing fluid, Motul RBF600 is much cheaper. It has a dry boiling point slightly higher than Castrol SRF at 593 degrees F. Castrol SRF's claim to fame is the high wet boiling point. But as long as your fluid is installed soon before the track day, you'll be just fine.

Valvoline SynPower DOT 4 has a dry boiling point of 503 degrees F, so it's the minimum performance fluid you'll be able to get away with, according to the rules of that particular club. See: SynPower Spec Sheet. This stuff is cheap and available just about everywhere

If you can find it, ATE TYP200 (same as ATE Super Blue Racing, but without the blue dye) offers a higher dry boiling point of 536 degrees F, while still being reasonably priced. This is what I use in all my street cars. Fine for street and track, unless you're running in the Advanced or Instructor run groups and using R-compound racing tires. For heavy track, I use Motul RBF600.
How much fluid (# of bottles/ounces/liters) do we need too bleed out all the stock fluid and replace with some of the high-temp you mentioned above?

"The 5.7L engine was designed to be a balance of cost, weight, and power. The SRT 6.1L engine was designed to kick ass." - Team SRT
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post #6 of 13 (permalink) Old 04-16-2007, 02:15 PM
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How much fluid (# of bottles/ounces/liters) do we need too bleed out all the stock fluid and replace with some of the high-temp you mentioned above?
For a "service bleed" when you are changing components, like brake calipers (e.g., installing a big brake kit) or brake lines, you should have a couple of liters on hand. I can install a BBK with less than one liter of fluid, but that's only when I'm showing off.

For a "track bleed", when you're simply trying to get some fresh fluid to the calipers, a single 1/2 liter container of brake fluid is plenty.
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post #7 of 13 (permalink) Old 04-17-2007, 08:35 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DZeckhausen View Post
For a "service bleed" when you are changing components, like brake calipers (e.g., installing a big brake kit) or brake lines, you should have a couple of liters on hand. I can install a BBK with less than one liter of fluid, but that's only when I'm showing off.

For a "track bleed", when you're simply trying to get some fresh fluid to the calipers, a single 1/2 liter container of brake fluid is plenty.
Dr. Z, let me ask another question so I am a clear. I'm getting my brake system completely flushed for track day. The place that is doing it wants me to give them 4 bottles of ATE TYP200 to do the job. Is that too much, not enough, or just right? Thanks.
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post #8 of 13 (permalink) Old 04-17-2007, 08:40 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Haywood View Post
Dr. Z, let me ask another question so I am a clear. I'm getting my brake system completely flushed for track day. The place that is doing it wants me to give them 4 bottles of ATE TYP200 to do the job. Is that too much, not enough, or just right? Thanks.
If all they are doing is bleeding the brakes and not changing any components (brake lines, calipers, master cylinder, etc.) then they're asking you for enough brake fluid to do your car, the service manager's car, the shop owner's wife's car, and have a spare can on the shelf!

Before you get mad at them, they may be using a large pressure bleeder that requires filling up a tank with fluid. If you're only doing one car, it's a very wasteful process. My fluid requirements listed above assume a manual bleed, also known as the "old fashioned" bleed. See: Bleeding Brakes for details.
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post #9 of 13 (permalink) Old 04-17-2007, 09:54 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DZeckhausen View Post
If all they are doing is bleeding the brakes and not changing any components (brake lines, calipers, master cylinder, etc.) then they're asking you for enough brake fluid to do your car, the service manager's car, the shop owner's wife's car, and have a spare can on the shelf!

Before you get mad at them, they may be using a large pressure bleeder that requires filling up a tank with fluid. If you're only doing one car, it's a very wasteful process. My fluid requirements listed above assume a manual bleed, also known as the "old fashioned" bleed. See: Bleeding Brakes for details.
Yup. They are using a machine to flush the brake system.
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post #10 of 13 (permalink) Old 04-24-2007, 04:20 PM
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I ran at Laguna Seca on Friday and did a quickee bleed of the front brakes after the third session. The improvement was phenomenal. If I had another 5 minutes I would have done the backs but they called our group up to the grid right when I started the second wheel.

Get a little bleeder bottle and learn the procedure for a quickee track bleed. Its easy. You won't regret it.

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