Chrysler 300C & SRT8 Forums banner

1 - 20 of 52 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I inherited my '05 300C from my father. The dealership he purchased it from apparently told him to use 87 octane gas which he did for three years. The car was problem-free until I took it over around 40,000 miles and started using the Chrysler recommended 89 octane.

About 10,000 miles after I started using 89 octane gas the car started to randomly stall. The dealer would clean the throttle body and it would be good for another 10,000 miles before it stalled again. I took it in today to a different dealer and their answer to the stalling problem is: switch to 87 octane and use a fuel cleaner every now and then. They said it would not hurt the engine (I took it to Central Chrysler in Norwood, MA).

The techs felt the car was getting a carbon buildup from the 89 octane gas. I now have two dealerships telling me that 87 octane is recommended. What do you think?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
57 Posts
thats interesting what the dealer told you. I have early 05 build (june 04) the was stalling alot and dealer kept saying they could not find anything wrong with it, then i decided to use 87 gas since last july and it has not stalled once. maybe there is some truth to it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
302 Posts
I always use 87 runs great no problems wit over 50k miles!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
903 Posts
Keep in mind 87 octane has more heat energy in it. It is actually cleaner since octane is an additive that is like oil. Try buying a can of octane booster and lighting it on fire. It won't burn unless you use a torch.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
4,213 Posts
I have an 05 300C and i had some random stalls and i started running 94 octane from chevron and no problems since good luck bud
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,411 Posts
I inherited my '05 300C from my father. The dealership he purchased it from apparently told him to use 87 octane gas which he did for three years. The car was problem-free until I took it over around 40,000 miles and started using the Chrysler recommended 89 octane.

About 10,000 miles after I started using 89 octane gas the car started to randomly stall. The dealer would clean the throttle body and it would be good for another 10,000 miles before it stalled again. I took it in today to a different dealer and their answer to the stalling problem is: switch to 87 octane and use a fuel cleaner every now and then. They said it would not hurt the engine (I took it to Central Chrysler in Norwood, MA).

The techs felt the car was getting a carbon buildup from the 89 octane gas. I now have two dealerships telling me that 87 octane is recommended. What do you think?
Take it to another dealer. Yours doesn't have a fawkin clue what they are saying. And don't mention the 87 octance thing seeing you are leading them in the wrong direction.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Northern300C:

I never brought up the change in octane to the dealer. In fact, that's the last thing I would have done. They must have tested the fuel I had in the car because they knew there was 89 in there. Once they mentioned switching back to 87, that's when I figured the switch to 89 must have caused it.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,411 Posts
Northern300C:

I never brought up the change in octane to the dealer. In fact, that's the last thing I would have done. They must have tested the fuel I had in the car because they knew there was 89 in there. Once they mentioned switching back to 87, that's when I figured the switch to 89 must have caused it.
If you didn't mention it to them, how did they know to tell you to switch back to 87? There is no way to test the fuel in a car.

Please stop directly associating the stalling with the octane, that is really foolish.

The 89 doesn't cause stalling, bad gas does. You got a bad batch of gas and that is what is causing the stalling. It is not the octane so please stop associating the engine stalling from you using the proper octane for the engine.

Go get some water remover and put it into your tank to remove the water and fill up at a GOOD station, not a mom and pop gas n go at the corner.

In tough times, most people won't even use 89 and it will sit in the tanks for longer periods which will have it go bad or collect more water.

That is your problem, not the octane. 1000s here use 89 and we have NO problems.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,077 Posts
It's very easy to test the fuel. At the track we are randomly tested to make sure we don't use a non approved fuel. Type and octane ARE tested.However I doubt like you do that they did. Also good point on why would tey say to switch back. Hard to get stuff past ya Northern :)
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,411 Posts
It's just a bunch of dealer BS really. They don't want to deal with it so they just tell you to go back to 87 which is just nonsense.

Filling up and having stalling is just bad gas, and nothing more. I would put some water remover in the tank, fill it up with some premium from Chevron or any brand station and drive it clean and then continue to use 89 from a good station.

It's just that easy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
If you didn't mention it to them, how did they know to tell you to switch back to 87? There is no way to test the fuel in a car.

Please stop directly associating the stalling with the octane, that is really foolish.

The 89 doesn't cause stalling, bad gas does. You got a bad batch of gas and that is what is causing the stalling. It is not the octane so please stop associating the engine stalling from you using the proper octane for the engine.

Go get some water remover and put it into your tank to remove the water and fill up at a GOOD station, not a mom and pop gas n go at the corner.

In tough times, most people won't even use 89 and it will sit in the tanks for longer periods which will have it go bad or collect more water.

That is your problem, not the octane. 1000s here use 89 and we have NO problems.
I like how you rushed to several conclusions:

1) that octane rating cannot cause stalling due to carbon buildup
2) that I use gas from mom and pop stations
3) that i mentioned i told them i switched to 89 after I said i didn't

I only use gas from the Exxon-Mobil or Shell stations next to my house. I never use mom and pop gas stations. Also, gas can be tested. How did they know there was 89 octane in the tank? They either tested it or guessed correctly. I was merely giving a history of the car's ownership.

I do agree the dealer does not want to deal with this issue. Central Chrysler-Jeep in Norwood, MA is the largest Chrysler dealer around yet their service department is filled with a bunch of *******s. The car will continue to stall and I will have to live with it.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,708 Posts
At 40K miles I'd be assuring myself that the spark plugs and air filter were were changed.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,411 Posts
I like how you rushed to several conclusions:

1) that octane rating cannot cause stalling due to carbon buildup
2) that I use gas from mom and pop stations
3) that i mentioned i told them i switched to 89 after I said i didn't

I only use gas from the Exxon-Mobil or Shell stations next to my house. I never use mom and pop gas stations. Also, gas can be tested. How did they know there was 89 octane in the tank? They either tested it or guessed correctly. I was merely giving a history of the car's ownership.

I do agree the dealer does not want to deal with this issue. Central Chrysler-Jeep in Norwood, MA is the largest Chrysler dealer around yet their service department is filled with a bunch of *******s. The car will continue to stall and I will have to live with it.
So you are attacking me for helping? I was covering the bases for all scenarios. Sorry if some of them were wrong.

You said you didn't tell them but they told you to go back to 87? How did they know you were using 89? They can't test it in your tank.

Also, you got a bad tank of gas, pure and simple. Go get some water remover and use a different station from now on.

Also, why do you have to use one dealership over another. Go to a different one and get it fixed.

But, truth be known, all stalling issues with 300C were linked almost all the time to bad gas. Try to figure it out yourself. The 87 solved it seeing 87 is popular and it is fresh gas which everyone uses so it doesn't sit.

Very few use 89 so it can sit for months without being filled.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
774 Posts
87 is popular and it is fresh gas which everyone uses so it doesn't sit.

Very few use 89 so it can sit for months without being filled.

I thought (and seen) that 87 is mixed with 91 at the pump to produce 89, at a 1:1 ratio. No gas station has a "mid-grade" dedicated tank anymore, unless they're old and haven't been renovated in the past 15 years.

So as long as 87 and 91 are being used (and I believe there are enough cars that require the higher grade to prevent the 91 from sitting in the tank too long), the 89 should always be fresh.

For what's it's worth, I used to work as a mechanic's apprentice for free in exchange for being taught the trade for free, and I've seen water be put into the holding tanks to avoid having to pump in that much more gas when the tanker showed up. This saved the owner money, and screwed up everyone's car. From what the owner told me, it's more common than you'd think.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,411 Posts
I thought (and seen) that 87 is mixed with 91 at the pump to produce 89, at a 1:1 ratio. No gas station has a "mid-grade" dedicated tank anymore, unless they're old and haven't been renovated in the past 15 years.

So as long as 87 and 91 are being used (and I believe there are enough cars that require the higher grade to prevent the 91 from sitting in the tank too long), the 89 should always be fresh.

For what's it's worth, I used to work as a mechanic's apprentice for free in exchange for being taught the trade for free, and I've seen water be put into the holding tanks to avoid having to pump in that much more gas when the tanker showed up. This saved the owner money, and screwed up everyone's car. From what the owner told me, it's more common than you'd think.
I have station here where I get my gas with a midgrade. Could be different with each company.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
630 Posts
I thought (and seen) that 87 is mixed with 91 at the pump to produce 89, at a 1:1 ratio. No gas station has a "mid-grade" dedicated tank anymore, unless they're old and haven't been renovated in the past 15 years.

So as long as 87 and 91 are being used (and I believe there are enough cars that require the higher grade to prevent the 91 from sitting in the tank too long), the 89 should always be fresh.

For what's it's worth, I used to work as a mechanic's apprentice for free in exchange for being taught the trade for free, and I've seen water be put into the holding tanks to avoid having to pump in that much more gas when the tanker showed up. This saved the owner money, and screwed up everyone's car. From what the owner told me, it's more common than you'd think.
I heard the same about 89, that its mixed at the pumps as you're pumping. If true, then I agree there should not be an issue with water or old gas from the fuel sitting in a seperate tank.
 
1 - 20 of 52 Posts
Top