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I've just checked the invoice for my last coolant change, which was only 4 yrs ago, not 5 as previously stated and it is described as "red". The cost of the coolant (5L) was £27.50 + VAT.

The first change was in Dec 2011 and cost £20.85 +VAT, but no colour stated. However, the reference code for the item was "ZCOMSLA5L" - I wonder if this could be a Comma ref. and would a Chrysler dealer use Comma instead of MOPAR?

So prices have skyrocketed over the years.
 

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Comma ref for G05 per their website seems to be "XHD5L" see bottom of this page Link or Google XHD5L Link and it comes up with Comma G05 in multiple places though no saying what Chrysler might have listed it as
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
Thanks guys for all the info and help, very interesting to me.

Unfortunately the service records from my previous owner are not that specific, so as there is no way of knowing if my existing orange coolant is HOAT or not, at some point soon I will drain, flush and refill either with the orange MOPAR coolant (around £50+ for 3.75 litres) or the yellow Comma G05 (£25 for 5 litres).....both are concentrate and are not diluted.
 

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For the sake of an extra £25, I would be inclined to go for MOPAR, but would 3.75 litres be sufficient? My fills used 5 litres. As mentioned earlier, the MB/Jeep dealer had a lot of bleeding trouble (no pun intended!), so I thought this extract from the Service Manual might help. Sorry, unable to copy diagrams.


"REFILLING COOLING SYSTEM - 3.0L DIESEL

1. Tighten the radiator draincock and the cylinder block drain plug(s) (if removed).

2. Remove thermostat housing bleed hose from two clips.

3. Hold the thermostat housing bleed hose up so that air can flow up to bottle. CAUTION: Failure to purge air from the cooling system can result in an overheating condition and severe engine damage.

4. Fill cooling system with the antifreeze mixture (Refer to LUBRICATION & MAINTENANCE/FLUID TYPES - DESCRIPTION). Fill pressure bottle to service line and install cap. NOTE: The engine cooling system will push any remaining air into the coolant bottle within about an hour of normal driving. As a result, a drop in coolant level in the pressure bottle may occur. If the engine cooling system overheats and pushes coolant into the overflow side of the coolant bottle, this coolant will be sucked back into the cooling system ONLY IF THE PRESSURE CAP IS LEFT ON THE BOTTLE. Removing the pressure cap breaks the vacuum path between the two bottle sections and the coolant will not return to cooling system.

5. With heater control unit in the HEAT position, operate engine with pressure bottle cap in place.

6. Add coolant to pressure bottle as necessary. Only add coolant to the pressure bottle when the engine is cold. Coolant level in a warm engine will be higher due to thermal expansion.

7. Reinstall the thermostat housing bleed hose in the two clips. "
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
Thanks for the Service Manual info, very detailed, so I will follow step by step.

Agree with your comment about best using MOPAR coolant, I may even see if I can find a Jeep dealer nearby that can do it for me!
 

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I've just checked my Owner's Manual and it states that the coolant capacity is 13.2 litres, so at 50% dilution this would require 6.6 litres of antifreeze, which is rather more than the 5 litres I had paid for in the past. Perhaps I've been driving on a less than full strength mixture? If you do find a Jeep (or maybe Fiat) dealer nearby, maybe you could verify the quantity of antifreeze required.

According to the Service Manual, the 3.5 litre petrol engine capacity is 10 litres, so 5 litres of antifreeze would be OK.
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
OK thanks. Just looked in my Service Manual too and mine says 13.2 qts (U.S.) and 12.5 litres (Metric) for the 3 litre Diesel.

I have made some enquiries today about coolant changes at a Jeep dealer in Guildford and one near Reading so will let you know what they say.

I think previous posts here on coolant changes have suggested that you are unlikely to be able to drain out the whole system so maybe that is why they only got 5 litres of coolant and 5 litres of de-ionised in your car.
 

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My Owner's manual only states 13.2 litres, but I do know that Chrysler documentation has numerous errors.

I would be interested to know how you get on with the Guildford dealer, as my own experiences have been disappointing. I am still waiting for them to return calls I made to them a few years ago about the airbag recalls and in the meantime had the work done by an Aston Martin/Jeep dealer.

You could be right about not being able to completely drain the system, but if you flush with water first and then add the specified amount of antifreeze before topping up with de-ionised water, wouldn't that ensure the correct mix? Have you tried testing your current mix for specific gravity? I have a tester for ethylene glycol antifreeze, but I don't know if it would work with HOAT.
 

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After draining the radiator and reservoir, a substantial amount of fluid remains in the block and heater core. Theoretically, you can drain the block by removing the drain plugs, if present. I don't know whether the CRD has any. The 5.7 Hemi has two, but in practice, they are rarely removed because they are very difficult to get at and are normally corroded in place. Some enthusiasts who service their own cars will remove them for cleaning, but I've never heard of a dealership or any shop removing them unless this was specified by the owner.

Some fluid will also remain in the heater core. You can drain this by using compressed air to force the remaining fluid out. In practice, this isn't terribly common, probably about on a par with removing the block drain plugs.

This is why it's impractical to try and obtain a 50% mixture of coolant and water using premix after a water flush. It can be done, but wastes a significant amount of the product, because you have no option but to continue to drain and refill the system until all the water is purged and what remains is a 50/50 mixture, so you wind up draining the premix in an effort to get all the water out.

This is also why you should flush with deionised or distilled water rather than "tap water" or "hose water", because it's very difficult to remove all water you used for flushing, and if minerals remain, they'll likely cause corrosion.

Any tester for ethylene glycol coolant with work just fine with either IAT, HOAT, or OAT coolant. It's a simple matter to "tweak" the coolant/water ratio as you purge the air from the system by refilling the reservoir with either concentrate or water as needed.
 
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