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Discussion Starter #1
Are there any self taught mechanics who can share how they learnt?

I'm really trying hard to learn, I've done Internet research and follow 3 of my favourite mechanics on YouTube. I read books and do my own work on my car but it hardly offers anything serious to resolve. I read forums like this and take from your knowledge but I don't get any real hands on experience.

I just wish I could one day work on other peoples cars but due to my full time job I'm really struggling to find a course were I can learn and gain qualification.

I don't want a career change but would enjoy servicing cars at home and earning a little extra.
 

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my 'mentor' was Mr Haynes and his workshop manuals.....not the modern manuals, they're nowt more than comic books. most things technical in them are 'refer to dealer' these days.
the old ones were very detailed.
only way to learn is to get your hands dirty, book reading is ok but no substitute.
been doing my own repairs and maintenance since around 1970 and im not afraid to tackle anything except auto gearbox's....they require a degree in witchcraft.
 

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Same as above. Bought my first car- a Mk3 Escort in 1989- and a Haynes manual and cheapo toolkit after I blew it up. Learned pretty quickly.... Wouldn't bother with a Haynes nowadays as everything is on the internet now. I've been tinkering with cars and bikes ever since and loathe paying someone else to do anything, but the alternators on these is a farm out job as I only have a sloped horrible driveway at the mo until I move into my new house. Having a pit of lift makes a lot of jobs so much easier and working out doors in this weather is not fun either.

How about getting a simple of classic to restore and learn that way, or just buy and run an old Landrover? You'll always carry a toolbox then, and learn real quick how to use it....
 

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A 1965 Triumph TR-4 kept me busy as a kid doing the repairs to keep it running. What a car. It was very sweet to drive when running, and chicks jumped in it at the beach, so I kept after it.

I had an experienced British Leyland Mechanic as a mentor. But I had work in gas stations, which in those days were called Service stations...
 

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I read books and do my own work on my car but it hardly offers anything serious to resolve.
Just be patient and something serious will soon crop up!

Seriously though, if I hadn't gained DIY experience over many years of car ownership and learning on much simpler cars, I probably wouldn't be attempting much now, not that I do much anyway and especially anything that involves crawling underneath.

You may find part-time courses available at your local County Council Adult Learning Centre, but they will probably be very basic. Alternatively, Technical Colleges offer both part-time and full-time courses in automotive engineering, but they are aimed at apprentices in the motor trade.

If you are thinking of servicing other peoples' cars, you would need to invest in suitable tools, including diagnostic equipment and you won't have access to the special tools available in dealerships. And then there are other issues to consider; eg warranty, insurance, tax, etc.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the replies they are most appreciated.

In terms of tools, I've been lucky enough to inherit some quality auto equipment including 3 half decent scan tools but when I say I would like to service cars, I really do mean basic services and nothing involving general repair or brakes.

When it comes to my own car I'm happy to have ago at bigger jobs.

So far I've replaced my EGR VALVE...TURBO BOOST ACTUATOR...SWAY BAR BUSHINGS AND DROP LINKS...INNER AND OUTER TIE RODS....STRUT TENSION BARS...REPLACED BULBS IN THE DASHBOARD CONSOLE...BRAKES AND ROTORS CHANGED and done a full service.

Judging by the common faults our members report here, I've no doubt I'll be learning something else soon.

I'll keep reading the forum you guys are teaching me loads.
 

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Best thing is to just dig in. I've learned most of what I know just by wrenching away at it. If you get an issue, don't look at the whole car, wiring, etc, just one bolt at a time. And, 99% of the time you won't do anything to hurt the car.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Buy a rover with a k series in it. After a few days you'll be swapping headgaskets, rewiring electrics, tracing leaks. I have to admit the forums are a wealth of knowledge as they are generally older people and the engine is common to maaaany UK motors so they share a wealth of problems!
 
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