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does anyone know of after market brakes to put on? does BREMBO make a kit?
 

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I spoke with BAER 2 months ago and they are supposed to have a complete kit after SEMA (now). I want to see results before I get all giddy about Brembo. The Acura TL 6spd I tested had Brembos and were no better than stock in C&D last year.
 

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While I have no product for the platform at this time, I'm searching for a test subject for measurements and look-see. If anyone has a contact in the Phoenix area (and no, not the one Baer might be using lol) please let me know. I'd been searching the Magnum guys a bit but if the 300 shares parts then the results will be the same.
 

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Best thing to get for your brakes is performance pads and a solonied brake line. Whole brake kits are really expensive for what you get.

-Todd
 

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PM sent to you as requested.



And I have no idea what this man is talking about: "and a solonied brake line"

"Whole brake kits are really expensive for what you get." That's certainly a subjective comment. You might feel differently if you had one.
 

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todd tce said:
PM sent to you as requested.



And I have no idea what this man is talking about: "and a solonied brake line"

"Whole brake kits are really expensive for what you get." That's certainly a subjective comment. You might feel differently if you had one.
I've had two. Not worth it. Just giving my opinion, don't force yours down mine :D

You know what a brake line is correct? Upgrading your cable from rubber would help increase brake feal, I'm sure you know that :)

IDK if they make metal types for this car as of yet, but here is an example for my Z28 from one of our sponsers.
TBRYNE [url said:
http://www.tbyrnemotorsports.com/ls1catalog.html][/url]
Serious race car owners have used flexible brake hoses of extruded Teflon for decades. They are protected against abrasion and swelling by a sheath of tightly braided stainless steel wire. The resistance to "line swell" both improves the firmness or "feel" of the brake pedal and reduces the time required for effective pressure to reach the brakes and begin to slow the car. The decreased system reaction time reduces stopping distance in emergency situations-- as much as 18 feet at 80 miles per hour.

Earl's HYPERFIRM® brake hoses not only meet all D.O.T., T.U.V., and J.W.A. standards and specifications for flexible brake hoses, they are individually inspected and testing before shipment. Earl's HYPERFIRM® hoses are the only Teflon stainless steel brake hoses to successfully pass all tests at a D.O.T.-contracted test laboratory. Each package contains front and rear lines.
-Todd
That is the information that site gives
 

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todd tce said:
And I have no idea what this man is talking about: "and a solonied brake line"
You're not the only one! Perhaps given the clarification, he meant a "solid" brake line?? I dunno - just a guess!

BTW, I'm in Phoenix also, and would be interested...
 

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CottyGee said:
You're not the only one! Perhaps given the clarification, he meant a "solid" brake line?? I dunno - just a guess!

BTW, I'm in Phoenix also, and would be interested...
It's steel, some companies make solonied locks, used the wrong words :(

But yea, getting a solid brake line does wonders for a whole lot cheaper :cool:

-Todd
 

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Ok, we'll cut you some slack and assume you're from out of town....at the least. It's all good. Curious to the exact kits and applications you had too.

I think what our English challenged friend here is trying to say is that Stainless Steel flex lines are a fine addition to your car. I won't disagree with that. In many cases however this, some zoomy looking rotors and sticky pads are all that folks need. In other cases there are those vehicle owners who look for a bit more; be it size, look, or thermal capacity for harder use applications. Like choosing your car or tires its all about the options.

And I'm certainly not forcing it down anyones throat. I can't, it's not done yet! lol

I'm out, thanks guys. You can PM me if you'd like to talk more on it or stopy by the shop for some touchy-feely time with parts.
 

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todd tce said:
Ok, we'll cut you some slack and assume you're from out of town....at the least. It's all good. Curious to the exact kits and applications you had too.

I think what our English challenged friend here is trying to say is that Stainless Steel flex lines are a fine addition to your car. I won't disagree with that. In many cases however this, some zoomy looking rotors and sticky pads are all that folks need. In other cases there are those vehicle owners who look for a bit more; be it size, look, or thermal capacity for harder use applications. Like choosing your car or tires its all about the options.

And I'm certainly not forcing it down anyones throat. I can't, it's not done yet! lol

I'm out, thanks guys. You can PM me if you'd like to talk more on it or stopy by the shop for some touchy-feely time with parts.
Baer Claw for a 94 Z28..those sure stopped well but I didn't think they were worth the price.

Also had Sure Stop for the same 94 Z28 after the Baer Claws wore out.

Atleast you agree that the brake line upgrade and pads are good as I said :)

-Todd
 

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I see.

Baers are decent, sure stop are rotors.

I think however your idea of a big brake kit and what I have in mind are a bit different. And relatively speaking the cost is not that high. I have calipers that run over $2000. Each. I'm considering a whole front set up for about $1500.
 

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Is there anything with a 15" rotor and 6 or 8 pot caliper? I ask because the wheels are so big on the car anything else would look small.

AdamR
 

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Adam

At this time the only options will be 13s or a bump to 14s. Case history has shown that this bump alone nets a price increase of about $575.

In the future the possibility exists for doing both 15s and 16s, but this will require both a change of master cylinder and an estimated cost of about $2500-3000.

It all comes down to what you want to spend. Thanks for asking.
 

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I spent time revewing a car today. Very nice parts actually.

The plan for a decent 13" kit is out the window. Nobody told me the stock rotor was 13.6"....I really don't see a market for smaller kits. Granted, a much fatter one has more value than the current one. But then again appearances are everything.

The 'new' plan is based on a 14 x 1.25 package. This is pretty much the same as the new C5 kits out from Wilwood.

I see three items;
Complete kit.
Caliper kit for the stock rotor.
Rotor kits for later up grade to the caliper kit.
(RED calipers optional)

I'll be in touch with the guys who have helped out thus far and see where it takes us. If there is an sincere interest in this package we'll pursue it. If not at least I have the data on it.
 

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I am very interested esp. if data shows shorter stopping distances and a firmer pedal. (not that the C brakes are bad). Any plans for offering SS lines.
 

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I'm kinda curious about a couple things. It was my understanding (and i could be wrong, why i'm posting) that there are dangers with Stainless Steel lines and going with drilled or slotted rotors. I've been told the problems with a non-flexing line is that they have a greater potential to blow out. Good lines flex to a small degree and provide firmer brake feel without risking increased pressure... again what i've been told.

The issue with drilled or slotted rotors is that they have better heat handling, but your overal surface contact is reduced, and therefore a simple "upgrade" to drilled rotors can actually increase your stopping distance. Meaning that if your driving a track or racing, drilled rotors are fine because your not really coming to a stop all that often. But on the road, you'd rarely experience brake fade from a standard rotor, so when you need to really hit the brakes for an emergency, your distance is increased.

From my experience, limited as it is, the only real upgrade that's worth it is increasing the size of the rotor. If it's a street car, just increase the overall size of the rotor, and use standard non-drilled non-slotted with a higher end low-noise low-dust high heat tolerance brake pad.

Having said all that... drilled rotors still look supa good ;)
 
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