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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
the october issue of consumer reports magazine has following brief comment. "our brief experience tells us that these two cars drive, ride, and handle in an accomplished, sophisticated way, but visibility is wanting all around". true enough, one must use caution when looking behind. but still worth the extra care (my words).
 

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Consumer Reports always plays favorite to Asian cars. Even though some Asian cars are built in U.S. I still refuse to consider Toyota, Honda and Nissan. Folks always talk about their reliabillity but fact is they have recalls just like any other domestic or german car. Asian cars have bland styling that looks worse after three years in the market. Consumer Reports should give some more credit to this Chrysler 300.
 

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I've read Consumer Reports since I was 15 and consulted their tests before purchase of any car (until buying the C, which was strictly emotional). They "play favorites" to Japanese cars because their manufacturers have spent the last 20 years turning quality control into an obsession. There is no question that the Camry, Accord, Corolla and certain other Japanese designed models (while not all) are incredibly reliable. They also lack soul, and that's why we all own 300's instead of them.

The magazine will soon do a full road test, and I will read it with interest. They are the only road tester that has no advertising and that makes a big difference in how unbiased they are in testing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
SilverHemi said:
I've read Consumer Reports since I was 15 and consulted their tests before purchase of any car (until buying the C, which was strictly emotional). They "play favorites" to Japanese cars because their manufacturers have spent the last 20 years turning quality control into an obsession. There is no question that the Camry, Accord, Corolla and certain other Japanese designed models (while not all) are incredibly reliable. They also lack soul, and that's why we all own 300's instead of them.

The magazine will soon do a full road test, and I will read it with interest. They are the only road tester that has no advertising and that makes a big difference in how unbiased they are in testing.
well supposed to be unbiased, and maybe are but the testers are human and i wonder if that frailty does enter into their testing/evaluation.
 

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I use CR as a facts and figures guide, thier bias is so obvious it's almost comical. They still talk about the Buick Lesabre/Park Ave. as a gas guzzler which gets 29mpg hwy and how efficient the Corolla is which gets 32 (automatic). I usually find a fair amount of ignorance in thier auto reporting. For example, they refer to Saab's placement of the ignition key between the seats on the console as quirky and inconvenient. They fail to recognize (or just plain "ignant") that Saab puts the key there for safety you CR idiots. Keys and dangling items have split many knee caps over the years. A very painful injury btw, my brother is an orthopedic surgeon and has performed may surguries of this type. I have no other items attached to my ignition key exept a small key ring. I keep all other keys, pocket knife etc. on a seperate ring. The next time you are in your 300, observe what has the potential to ruin your knee hanging from your key. We use our belts, have all these great safety items to better survive crashes only to be needlessly mangled by our key chain. I digress again.
 

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Written by a bunch of school marms and grandmothers.
I consistently have avoided reading it for 20 years other than to occassionally amuse myself and see what cars accountants are buying this year.
 

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CR (auto section) has always been a bunch of anal beancounters salavating over the likes of Toyota Echoes built by souless Asian industries.

Real auto enthusiasts try real hard to avoid CR and their ilk, IMHO.

So there - :p :p :p :p
 

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CR has it's uses; but after reading them descibe how awesome Bose and Turtle wax are I've come to the conclusion that there are areas where their expertise is lacking.
 

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I read CR but make up my own mind as many of you do. They seem obsessed with fuel mileage which I also consider important but it is not the number one consideration. For many years, they seemed to hate GM cars but lately they have a good comment occasionally. I will be surprised if they look favorably on the 300 C. They like cars with only the bare necessities. I used CR in an attempt to get the dealer price on a vehicle a couple of years ago. They provided very little info so I called them about their report. They said ask the dealer. Go figure!
 

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The following is quoted from the November, 2004 issue of "Consumer Reports":

First look: Chrysler 300 (a pic of the Touring accompanies the article)

Of the new models introduced for 2005, the Chrysler 300 has been one of the most talked about. Our initial impressions of two versions we've bought for testing are that they are pleasant to drive, with roomy quiet cabins. Helped by a rear-suspension that's modeled after that of the Mercedes-Benz E-Class luxury sedan, the 300's handling is sound, though not sporty, and the ride is firm, yet not uncomfortable. Overall, the interior quality is a significant upgrade for Chrysler, but there are some drawbacks that detract from the car's appeal.

The boldly styled 300 and its wagon counterpart, the Dodge Magnum -- both large, rear-wheel-drive cars with prominent grilles and a sharp-edged design -- represent a new direction for Chrysler's cars. By contrast, Chrysler's trademark since the early '90's has been sleeker, front-wheel-drive, cab-forward models.

The 300 line includes four trim levels: the base 300, 300 Touring, 300 Limited, and top-of-the-line 300C. For testing, we bought both the well-equipped 300C ($36,685) and the Touring model ($29,775).

To aid the snow traction and handling stability of this rear-wheel-drive car, optional traction control and electronic stability control (ESC) systems are commonly available, except on the base model. All-wheel drive will be available later.

The 300C features Chrysler's 340-hp, 5.7-liter Hemi V8, which gives the car a strong, muscular feel. The Hemi name is more nostalgic than technically significant. First used in the mid-1960s, it refers to hemispherical or dome-shaped combustion chambers, a common design.

To help improve gas mileage, the big V8 is equipped with a system that shuts off half of the engine's cylinders when the car is cruising at a steady highway speed. All cylinders are instantly activated when more power is needed for acceleration or climbing a grade. We've found the transition between eight and four cylinders smooth and mostly imperceptible. A similar variable-displacement system has been introduced in some GM pickups, and another will be used in the upcoming Honda Accord Hybrid sedan.

The cabin is roomy but the high window line, shallow windshield, and large rear roof pillars reduce visibility. Drivers may have to duck to see overhead traffic lights. Some flimsy door-trim materials and suspension noise also also detract from the luxurious driving experience.

Other complaints so far focus on the relatively small trunk, the lack of assist grips over the front doors, and wiper-and-cruise-control stalks, identical to those used in Mercedes cars, that are unintuitive and inconvenient to operate.
The 300 Touring version utilizes the 250-hp, 3.5-liter engine that was used in the front-wheel-drive Chrysler Condorde and Dodge Intrepid. But the engine is quieter in the 300. The Touring isn't as quick or lavishly equipped as the 300C.

We'll tell you how both the 300C and the Touring model rank against the competition when we publish the full test reports in an upcoming issue."
 

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mileshoover said:
The following is quoted from the November, 2004 issue of "Consumer Reports":

The Hemi name is more nostalgic than technically significant. First used in the mid-1960s, it refers to hemispherical or dome-shaped combustion chambers, a common design."
Gang,

These guys are right on the ball. I just love this new breed of Car Mag reporters. They weren't around back then and they don't know how to research their facts before they stick their feet into their mouths. It really made a come back for the 1st time in the early to mid 60's in the Mopar Race cars (426 Hemi’s). That's because Chrysler first introduced it in the early to mid 50's!!! Plus its not a common design. Most American OEM motors makers (everyone but Chrysler) use a wedge shape combustion chamber.
 
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