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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey Guys!

I am new to the forum so apologies if the question I am going to ask have already been asked before. I Have a 2016 Chrysler 300 V6, it has done 49000KMS and The guy who serviced it earlier said that Logbook states I need to have Transmission service (700$) and Diff oil change (90$) and Coolant Flush and Fill (120$).
Questions :
1. Should I have the Transmission service done?
2. Is there anything out of these I can do myself with the fluids from local store i.e SuperCheap, Repco, Autobarn.
3. If coolant flush can be done at home. Which coolant can be used.

Thanks in Advance.
 

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I think if you check the factory recommended service chart in your owner's manual, you'll find that you don't need either a transmission service or differential fluid change. From an enthusiast perspective, it's not a bad idea to change your differential fluid at five years old, regardless of mileage, but the idea of servicing a ZF 8HP transmission at 49,000 KM is absurd. Forget it.

Your coolant, however, is likely rated either 5 years/100,000 miles or 10 years/150,000 miles, meaning that it's due. But I would not perform a flush, just a drain and refill, a very simple if time-consuming procedure, which you can certainly perform at home. The two most important things to remember are; make sure that you use the type of coolant specified in your owner's manual, and never trust anyone to add coolant to your Chrysler 300. Here in the USA, Chrysler switched from HOAT to OAT coolant in 2013, and it's very common for owners, mechanics and even factory-trained Chrysler service techs to mix the two, which can result in sludging that can clog your cooling system.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
@CtCarl , Thank you so much for your thorough reply. I have checked the manual for coolant information, It says 10Years/150,000. But I don’t think changing coolant would be an issue as it is not that expensive. In manual it says OAT formula, I have gone to local store and searched coolant for my car. There I have seen the Red material(Currently car is running Red Coolant). On bottle in local store it says Si-OAT not only OAT. Is that okay to use , I saw others they had HOAT which you say is not recommended. So is it okay to use Si-OAT? This is what I have seen. https://www.supercheapauto.com.au/p/penrite-penrite-red-oem-coolant-premix--5-litre/575804.html

The only OAT I have found is this one:Penrite Blue OEM Coolant Premix 5 Litre
gclid=Cj0KCQjw9O6HBhCrARIsADx5qCRDHtB6_ORVvrid1T7eEOvcBdVmg9kZHgEWt7iorP-BArKSTSXN3TsaAhVaEALw_wcB&gclsrc=aw.ds

Which it says is not suitable for my car. Can you please help here. And above you said you personally would NOT do a flush just a refill. What would be the difference or additional step in a flush?
 

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I have checked the manual for coolant information, It says 10Years/150,000.
Correct, sorry about the typo. I've corrected it, OAT is 10/150,000.

I would not use any of those. If you can't get genuine Chrysler purple OAT, I would not change it at all.

And above you said you personally would NOT do a flush just a refill. What would be the difference or additional step in a flush?
Drain and refill is just that; open the radiator petcock (cold!), drain the radiator, refill it. Run the car, purge air from the system.

Flushing is a much more complex procedure, where you drain and refill with distilled water, run the car, let it cool, and repeat these steps until the drained water runs clear, then refill with the correct mix of water & coolant.

Flushing is for neglected cooling systems. If you change your fluid every five years, you'll never need to flush.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Correct, sorry about the typo. I've corrected it, OAT is 10/150,000.

I would not use any of those. If you can't get genuine Chrysler purple OAT, I would not change it at all.



Drain and refill is just that; open the radiator petcock (cold!), drain the radiator, refill it. Run the car, purge air from the system.

Flushing is a much more complex procedure, where you drain and refill with distilled water, run the car, let it cool, and repeat these steps until the drained water runs clear, then refill with the correct mix of water & coolant.

Flushing is for neglected cooling systems. If you change your fluid every five years, you'll never need to flush.
Well then I don’t think so I will be able to do that at home. But From the beginning car is running on RED COOLANT. What If coolant is running low in reservoir below the marked level just a bit. How should I top it up then? Are there no alternatives for Mopar coolant.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
@CtCarl , Well On more research i found something I thought I would ask you to clear the confusion. We can only use OAT… Right? So mopar one is not available tge purple stuff of mopar is HOAT whereas OAT is Red/pink ish. I have found this as a OAT coolant. It says in Description. Please advise.
 

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I was trying to get by without going into too much detail. I thought that it was pretty unlikely that anyone changed the factory fill before you got the car, with only the equivalent of 30,000 miles at six years old, and you don't really need to service your cooling system at this point anyway, so if you're determined to do so, it's pretty easy and safe to drain and refill with the exact same product recommended in your owner's manual.

There are, in some cases, regional differences in coolant, so bear in mind that everything I tell you is USA-specific, which again, is why I keep telling you to use what's in your owner's manual.

Here goes;

2005-2012 Chrysler 300s use HOAT coolant. The factory fill is orange in color. The service part that is sold over the counter is generally described as "Pink", but in my experience, it has a pinkish-red color. The part number is 68048953AB for concentrate, and 68051212AC for premix. For a drain and refill, you can use either, but after a flush and fill, you need concentrate, because your system will be full of plain water, and it's impractical to try and attain a correct 50/50 mix of coolant and water when you're starting with 100% water and all you have is 50/50 premix.

At some point in 2013, Chrysler switched to OAT coolant. Very roughly, OAT trades off the fact that HOAT protects your cooling system components from corrosion more quickly, but has a longer service life. The factory fill is typically cherry red. The Chrysler OAT sold over the counter is dyed purple, but in service, it tends to color-shift to red. The part numbers are 68163848AB for concentrate, and 68163849AA for premix. When they made the change, they updated the owner's manual, which is another reason I always tell folks to check their owner's manual to confirm which coolant is correct.

Mopar TSB 07-004-12 11-03-2012

The problem with this change, is that HOAT and OAT are not compatible, and mixing them will usually lead to "gelling" or sludging of your cooling system, which can cause all manner of problems, up to and including overheating and premature engine failure. But for some reason, that doesn't stop owners and even people who should know better, like Chrysler service techs, from mixing them. So it's better to be safe than sorry. When a member asks me what coolant to put in their 300, I tell them that if they bought it new or are otherwise confident of it's service history, they should use exactly what's called for in the owner's manual. In the USA, if you can't get your hands on genuine Mopar Purple OAT, I suggest any Nitrile- and Silicate-free OAT, such as Prestone Nitrile-Free Extended Life.

But if you are not sure of what coolant is in there, especially if it is an ostensibly non-compatible color, like bright neon green for example, I suggest performing a complete flush and fill with the correct concentrate, mixed with enough distilled/deionised/demineralised water to result in a 50/50 solution. But compared to an easy-breezy drain and fill, flushing is a pain in the ass. All other things being equal, I would suspect that your car still has some version of Mopar OAT, which was either red from the factory, or has color-shifted from purple to red. But it's your car, not mine, and you have to go with your own comfort level.

I can't talk intelligently about why Supercheap Auto says that the Nulon Red Premium Long Life Coolant you linked to is not compatible with your car, except to say that that there is a lot of misinformation out there about Chrysler coolant, and it wouldn't surprise me that a parts dealer would get it wrong. For whatever it's worth, that coolant does appear to be the correct formulation for a USA-spec 2016 300, but I wouldn't use it myself unless I could not get the correct Mopar coolant.

Do they not still have Chrysler dealers in OZ? When I was there, I believe there were at least a few in QLD and NSW.
 

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I've had two coolant changes so far, both done at dealerships. Last one was by MB/Jeep dealer who was running a special offer at the time and agreed to do it while I waited. I think they may have regretted the special offer as it took a very long time which they attributed to bleeding (no pun intended) difficulties.

I'm due for another change this year and it's going to be another dealer job.

As my engine is a MB CRD, my experience may not be relevant.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I was trying to get by without going into too much detail. I thought that it was pretty unlikely that anyone changed the factory fill before you got the car, with only the equivalent of 30,000 miles at six years old, and you don't really need to service your cooling system at this point anyway, so if you're determined to do so, it's pretty easy and safe to drain and refill with the exact same product recommended in your owner's manual.

There are, in some cases, regional differences in coolant, so bear in mind that everything I tell you is USA-specific, which again, is why I keep telling you to use what's in your owner's manual.

Here goes;

2005-2012 Chrysler 300s use HOAT coolant. The factory fill is orange in color. The service part that is sold over the counter is generally described as "Pink", but in my experience, it has a pinkish-red color. The part number is 68048953AB for concentrate, and 68051212AC for premix. For a drain and refill, you can use either, but after a flush and fill, you need concentrate, because your system will be full of plain water, and it's impractical to try and attain a correct 50/50 mix of coolant and water when you're starting with 100% water and all you have is 50/50 premix.

At some point in 2013, Chrysler switched to OAT coolant. Very roughly, OAT trades off the fact that HOAT protects your cooling system components from corrosion more quickly, but has a longer service life. The factory fill is typically cherry red. The Chrysler OAT sold over the counter is dyed purple, but in service, it tends to color-shift to red. The part numbers are 68163848AB for concentrate, and 68163849AA for premix. When they made the change, they updated the owner's manual, which is another reason I always tell folks to check their owner's manual to confirm which coolant is correct.

Mopar TSB 07-004-12 11-03-2012

The problem with this change, is that HOAT and OAT are not compatible, and mixing them will usually lead to "gelling" or sludging of your cooling system, which can cause all manner of problems, up to and including overheating and premature engine failure. But for some reason, that doesn't stop owners and even people who should know better, like Chrysler service techs, from mixing them. So it's better to be safe than sorry. When a member asks me what coolant to put in their 300, I tell them that if they bought it new or are otherwise confident of it's service history, they should use exactly what's called for in the owner's manual. In the USA, if you can't get your hands on genuine Mopar Purple OAT, I suggest any Nitrile- and Silicate-free OAT, such as Prestone Nitrile-Free Extended Life.

But if you are not sure of what coolant is in there, especially if it is an ostensibly non-compatible color, like bright neon green for example, I suggest performing a complete flush and fill with the correct concentrate, mixed with enough distilled/deionized/demineralized water to result in a 50/50 solution. But compared to an easy-breezy drain and fill, flushing is a pain in the ass. All other things being equal, I would suspect that your car still has some version of Mopar OAT, which was either red from the factory or has color-shifted from purple to red. But it's your car, not mine, and you have to go with your own comfort level.

I can't talk intelligently about why Supercheap Auto says that the Nulon Red Premium Long Life Coolant you linked to is not compatible with your car, except to say that that there is a lot of misinformation out there about Chrysler coolant, and it wouldn't surprise me that a parts dealer would get it wrong. For whatever it's worth, that coolant does appear to be the correct formulation for a USA-spec 2016 300, but I wouldn't use it myself unless I could not get the correct Mopar coolant.

Do they not still have Chrysler dealers in OZ? When I was there, I believe there were at least a few in QLD and NSW.
@CtCarl, Appreciate your taking time and coming up with so much information. I took the coolant out of the reservoir just a bit to see the color it has a purple hue to it. The color from the top looks red but has some purple tint to it. So I think it is the stock one and no one has changed it. Now I have given a call to the jeep dealership which services Chrysler too and has Mopar parts available. I am waiting to hear from them. For now, I will not change the coolant. If you can advise how should I top up the reservoir as it is below the MIN marked line. Thanks!
 

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@CtCarl, Appreciate your taking time and coming up with so much information. I took the coolant out of the reservoir just a bit to see the color it has a purple hue to it. The color from the top looks red but has some purple tint to it. So I think it is the stock one and no one has changed it. Now I have given a call to the jeep dealership which services Chrysler too and has Mopar parts available. I am waiting to hear from them. For now, I will not change the coolant. If you can advise how should I top up the reservoir as it is below the MIN marked line. Thanks!
What are we talking about, one litre? Top it off with distilled/deionised/demineralized water, then when you get the correct coolant concentrate, drain and refill.
 
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