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have just filed for a replacement 300C thru the lemon law in Illinois...anybody else have the drift problem that could not be fixed? or used the lemon law? :(
 

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Neil

Did you first try to get it resolved thru the regional factory rep and did they say no so thats why you went lemon law? Just curious.

Bob
 

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had it for repairs 4 times for the drift prolem..they changed/adjusted the cradle and put the bolt kit in. The factory reps fine tuned the adjustments and it still drifts. a little worse than before. they said it was inj specks and thats it. go on google and put in your state and "lemon law" it basically free. if the law firm takes your case Chrysler pays the legal fees
 

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Once you use the lemon law you can kiss off ever being approved for any kind of manufacture financing and dealers will never sell you a vehicle below MSRP. In other words you better make sure that was your last resort because you will be unoffically blackballed.
 

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LoanWizard said:
Once you use the lemon law you can kiss off ever being approved for any kind of manufacture financing and dealers will never sell you a vehicle below MSRP. In other words you better make sure that was your last resort because you will be unoffically blackballed.
I think that's BS. I don't believe it. Every car I have negotiated a price on was done prior to them running my credit. Dealers don't run background checks on people. Do they have some secret database that they all contribute info about their bad purchasers - no. Anyone here ever use the lemon law and have a story about their subsequent purchases?
 

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In case my handle didn't clue you in on what i do for a living, I'll tell you. I've been in the loan business for 27 years. Yes there is a dealer database of people who have returned a vehicle under the lemon law, no it is not secret it is very public. Dealers choose to use that information how ever they wish. manufacture financing will be declined for anyone who has returned a car to the manufacturer. You can always finance through your own bank.
 

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NeilR said:
had it for repairs 4 times for the drift prolem..they changed/adjusted the cradle and put the bolt kit in. The factory reps fine tuned the adjustments and it still drifts. a little worse than before. they said it was inj specks and thats it. go on google and put in your state and "lemon law" it basically free. if the law firm takes your case Chrysler pays the legal fees
Hi Neil,

Your problem has attracted a lot of interest on this forum. Is it possible to describe the drifting problem in real world driving terms? It would be helpful to list: type of road(s); number of passengers; speed of vehicle; tire pressures; and a good description in your own words of the drifting that occurs.

Do you have a benchmark to compare to - such as another 300C or a different make of car? I mention this because all cars "drift" off centerline to some degree or another.

It must be frustrating to have a new car that you cannot enjoy. Hope this forum can help you.
 

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LoanWizard said:
In case my handle didn't clue you in on what i do for a living, I'll tell you. I've been in the loan business for 27 years. Yes there is a dealer database of people who have returned a vehicle under the lemon law, no it is not secret it is very public. Dealers choose to use that information how ever they wish. manufacture financing will be declined for anyone who has returned a car to the manufacturer. You can always finance through your own bank.
So, let me get this straight. A manufacturer or dealer will sell a car to someone on this "lemon list", but will not finance it, thus giving up their extra profits in the financing. They do this because they built a car that had problems that their dealer network could not fix and thus they were compelled to take the car back. So they give up their own financing $$ to punish the purchaser. Yeah, that sounds like the smart thing for them to do.

I see posts on this board every day about stupid things that the dealers or manufacturers do. If this lemon database is another thing in their proverbial "bag of tricks", then it's just another reason why people have such contempt for car dealers.
 

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hdplasmas said:
Does lomen law require the use of an attorney or any fees involved. Better yet can you briefly explain the process?
Chrysler pays attorney's fees
 

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hdplasmas said:
Does lomen law require the use of an attorney or any fees involved. Better yet can you briefly explain the process?
go on Google at search on your state and lemon law...Pick a law firm that specializes in lemon law and the law firm will review the facts(in IL the lemon law point is same problem 3 times in a year) and accept your case and porceed to take Chrysler to court at no cost to you
 

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rdmac said:
Neil

Did you first try to get it resolved thru the regional factory rep and did they say no so thats why you went lemon law? Just curious.

Bob
3 times at dealer..4th time the regional techs tried. still drifts but they said adjustments are in specs
 

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Northern Rider said:
Hi Neil,

Your problem has attracted a lot of interest on this forum. Is it possible to describe the drifting problem in real world driving terms? It would be helpful to list: type of road(s); number of passengers; speed of vehicle; tire pressures; and a good description in your own words of the drifting that occurs.

Do you have a benchmark to compare to - such as another 300C or a different make of car? I mention this because all cars "drift" off centerline to some degree or another.

It must be frustrating to have a new car that you cannot enjoy. Hope this forum can help you.
any road. any speed. any # of passengers although haven't tried it with more than 2 passengers. to give you an ideal on a new straight highway it will drift right all the time..I can drive in right lane, aim left over centerline(crown) with hands not on wheel and it will go left over crown and then drift right back over the crown..in other words uphill from the left lane over the crown to the ditch...tried Magnum(came chasis) and other 300. It is a know problem because Chrysler has several TSBs(at least 2 maybe 30 alreadt out on the drifting problem.
 

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You obviously have a serious problem, it vexes me that DC did not discover this flaw that seems to affect many cars. Let's hope the ball joints don't fail like the Durango. btw, my 02 X5 required new control arms at 24K :mad: , the svc rep knew exactly what it was over the phone, obviously not his first experience.
 

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Northern Rider said:
I mention this because all cars "drift" off centerline to some degree or another.
Gang,

You should be able to drive down an interstate with your hands off of the steering wheel in either lane for a count of 1000/1 thruough 1000/10 before the car starts to move out of the lane your in.
 

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I disagree - I've owned many cars, and not one would track straight for 10 seconds. That is a long time. Perhaps a big slow-boat like an old Cadillac would do this, but any car with sporting pretensions would be more likely to drift. Wider rubber means greater tracking of minor road irregularities. A faster-ration steering means the wheels move more per degree of steering travel. And so on. Heck - my old Miata would dart into the next lane if you so much as thought about it.

Realistically, the car should move into the lane indicated by road tilt. If it doesn't, then it means that the steering has so much stiffness that the other physical forces are damped out. And I wouldn't want steering that stiff. I like feeling the tire-road interface, and knowing and feeling the forces acting on the tire is part of that. Now, if you drift right from a reverse-crowned lane, that's a problem, but on a normal tilted-to-the-right lane you should drift right.

I think that a little bit of this controversy is caused by not being used to RWD. When pulling a car along from the front using FWD, the back tends to get pulled back into line if it swings out. With RWD, the front has a minute tendency to move farther out of line, rather than be pulled back into line. Try taking a shoebox and a piece of plywood. Tilt the ply, and pull the shoebox along with just one finger on the center front. Now repeat it, pushing the box with just one finger in the center of the back. Which one is easier to control? This is the similar to the phenomenon that makes tailwheel aircraft so much more, um, *entertaining* to handle on the ground than tricycle-gear craft. Most aircraft now use tricycle gear, and so "conventional" gear is now anything but that.

My Audi had AWD, and very neutral handling, but it would drift on a road too. The force acting on a car to drift to the lower side of the lane is not large, but it is the only unbalanced force acting on the car (ignoring friction, which would cause the car to coast to a halt if not more-than-compenstated-for by the engine).
 

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Deegee- I concur with everything you say - especially the part about many forum members not being familiar with RWD.

Here's another point - notice how far your 300 freewheels or coasts when you take your foot off the gas - it seems to go forever. This is partly rwd and mostly good engineering. There is very little rolling resistance (friction) on the rolling parts in this car.

I can eliminate "drifting" on any car by cranking in lots of toe-in (some FWD have to have lots of toe-in just to drive safely). You won't drift but you won't handle well. You will wear out tires and other components prematurely.

There was a "right pull" issue on some 300's. The kit seems to have fixed it.
I find the steering "sweet". The car almost leads into corners as opposted to following. There is no play in the wheel. Also, crank your wheels full left or right. Look at the car from the front. Notice the extreme camber - you won't see that on a FWD!

As to Neil's lemon law issue. He may indeed have a lemon. It happens with any manufacturer. However, I have seen no evidence that there is a generic design or manufacturing fault with regard to steering in the 300s or magnums.
 

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Hi guys/gals, I am new to the forum and I do have experience with a lemon law suit through GM. Once you have satisfied the requirements of your states lemon law statue, you are free to proceed forward with an attorney. In most states, you are no longer in the lemon law process, as it is typically arbitration and hopefully a mechanical/electrical fix to the problems, but you are in a real lawsuit against the manufacturer. If you have satisfied the requirements of the state statue, you are pretty much guranteed to win and, yes, the manufacturer will end up paying your attorny fees in the settlement. It wasn't a fun experience in my case, but it did what it was supposed to do and I have bought(financed many of them) through the same manufacturer many times sense. There is absolutely NO TRUTH to the comment above about financing being denied to you(it doesn't go on your credit).

From your comments on the drifting issue, though, I would guess you are in a interesting predictament....You probably can pass it off as a real issue since DC tried to repair it 4 times, but 10 seconds on just about any road in America without touching is basically impossible(all modern roads are built with drainage in mind and you have a slight pitch because of that....).

Todd
 
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