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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Here is an article I wrote for a trade magazine, this is the rough draft copy (still has type o's)

This is the time of year when our cars get subjected to all sorts of stress. The constant change in temperature and humidity can make leather seats dry out which result in cracks and splits. The dirt and salt you carry into your car get into the carpet and make it difficult to clean. Ever try to remove salt stains from carpet? During the winter we usually drive with the windows rolled up and all the environmental contaminants in the air lay dormant and turn the air into a stale breeding ground for allergies, mold, and bacteria. The exterior of your car gets bombarded mother nurture’s most powerful bunch, salt and snow. Here are a few suggestions to keep your car looking good and to protect it against winter damage. First, take a close look at your interior. Now is the time to remove all the clutter from the summer, and to get organized. After you vacuum the carpet, it is a good idea to put down those heavy-duty rubber floor mats. They will save your carpet from winter’s wrath. Special attention must be given to leather, as it will begin to age quickly. I recommend a two-part procedure of cleaning and conditioning. Never use a harsh brush like nylon or bristle, horsehair works best, as it is gentle on fine leather. Spray the cleaner on the leather and use a soft cloth (I like flannel) to remove the excess cleaner. After you have cleaned your seats, its time to condition. Put some conditioner on a terry applicator pad and work into the leather, apply to dry for a few minutes. Remove with a soft clothe. You will notice as you condition the oils and nutrients being restored back into the leather. This will prolong the life of your seats. Next you should apply a water based dressing on the plastic/rubber and vinyl components of your interior, like the dash and door panels. Most dressing have UV protection to repel the suns harmful rays.


The exterior of your car gets the brunt of winter’s fierce blow. Salt, sleet, and snow will harm your finish over time unless you protect it. Most people don’t know that the best wax on the market will last 30 days on a driver car under normal conditions. Under winter’s extreme conditions it won’t even last that long. Modern day Synthetic polymer sealants are designed to last 6 times longer (up to 6 months) and will get you through the winter months. Car dealers typically charge hundreds of dollars to apply a synthetic, but you can do it yourself for under 20 bucks. Modern paints have come a long way in terms of technology and it only makes sense to apply a product that provides the best sacrificial layer of protection on your finish. If your car has been made in the last 25 years it has a clear coat dual stage paint system. The clear coat (shiny top layer) is only 4 mils thick, or the thickness of a piece of paper. It’s important to protect it with the best products available. Check around for prices if you don’t want to do it your self, a fair price at a professional detail shop should be around $175 as compared to a dealer which can be up to $900. Gary
 

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Great article Gary, thanks. Quick question for you on leather care of the seats. I have the light interior and noticed that the "blue" from my "blue jeans" is starting to show on the seat. What's your removal technique for this stain? Anything you can put on the seats to protect them from this.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Jason, you bring up a good point. What is happening is the dye from your jeans is getting transfered to the leather. If you allow it to stay there, it will get harder to remove because the dye will have a chance to penetrate the leather. Its best to remove it right away then condition. My leather cleaner on my web site is PH balanced, so it will effectively remove the stains without harming fine leather. Avoid using any type of all purpose cleaners or harsh soaps, you could remove the dye in the leather. After you clean the seats use a conditioner like the one I sell. Keep in mind that nothing will prevent the transfer from your jeans from getting on the seats, however by keeping your leather conditioned it will provide protection from the jean dye so it doesn't make a permanent color change, along with ,making it easier to clean. For the record my cleaner is 8 bucks/ which is wholesale prices. Gary




djjasond said:
Great article Gary, thanks. Quick question for you on leather care of the seats. I have the light interior and noticed that the "blue" from my "blue jeans" is starting to show on the seat. What's your removal technique for this stain? Anything you can put on the seats to protect them from this.
 

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Do you recommend the same techniques for using leather cleaner (i.e. spray on wipe off) even if the instructions on the product are different (spray onto damp terry sponge, rub on, rub out with clean damp terry sponge, dry with terry towel, apply conditioner)?
Richard
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Richard, most cleaners are a spray and wipe, However I would follow the instructions on the bottle. I'm just used to my Ultimate line, which is easy to use. Spray/wipe dry/condition




marlinspike said:
Do you recommend the same techniques for using leather cleaner (i.e. spray on wipe off) even if the instructions on the product are different (spray onto damp terry sponge, rub on, rub out with clean damp terry sponge, dry with terry towel, apply conditioner)?
Richard
 

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Just did the "Gary Special"

I did the whole thing this am. Washed, used Gary's stuff and MF towels (THEY REALLY SUCK up the water)

Then used his Paint cleaner and then the paint sealer

Car looks great. Also used the chrome polish/sealer on the chrome and all of my glass.

Gary, your stuff works great.

And thanks for the detailing tips.

BTW for you guys that are height challenged like me, I bought this great platform from Costco. $90.00 bucks

18" high 36" long. about 16" wide with a top tray to hold your stuff.

Folds up like a small step ladder. Lightweight aluminum.

Great for working on the roof of car (or SUV if you have one) I have one of each.
 

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hey Gary, how close are you to Chicago? The wife has a conference over there in Nov. and I was thinking I might tag alone to get my first trip in my C and thought.. hrmmmm, might be a good time to get her professionally done. (The C that is, not my wife! :) )
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Mr Happy, I'm 25 miles NW of Chicago, or about 10 miles west of O'Hare, Let me know in advance so I can plan for it, if nothing else we could meet up and chat a while. Look forward to meeting up with you. Gary
 
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