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Well I just bought myself another 300c CRD. It's a 2006 car but it only has 34k miles on it. The previous owner gave me a full service history with it which looks great but my concern was that he'd had it parked on his driveway without moving it for over 6 months. I drove it home ok but the battery died on the second day I had it. I had a full service carried out by my local garage and I've replaced the battery since. It seems to be running quite nicely but I suppose my reason for posting on here is to ask about anything I should perhaps pay a bit of attention to with the car. Despite it's low milage, I'm wondering if there's anything I should look closer at with regards to the car being 15 years old? Also is there any potential problems that could occur from the length of time it was left sitting by the previous owner?

Thanks
 

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I don't know anything about the CRD.

With that said, I am always leery of low-mileage cars, especially when they've been sitting, doubly so if they've been sitting outdoors. The big problem...and I realize that temperatures are relatively stable in England...is that temperature swings cause condensation, and condensation leads to rust. Internal engine rust and corrosion of other components are what trouble me most about this scenario.

What I would suggest is that you change out all the fluids; transmission, brake, power steering, etc. They are all hygroscopic and will absorb a certain amount of moisture, which you need to get out of there. For the lubricants, the additive package will eventually be depleted, and together with the excess moisture, the fluids will not provide the protection they should. And the boiling point of the brake fluid is lowered substantially by moisture content. Brake fluid more than three or four years old will boil easily and can lead to brake failure.
 

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My 2006 CRD has just under 50k miles on the clock and has covered less than 1k miles over the past 12 months. It is also parked outside on the drive. However, it hasn't remained completely static for more than 2 or 3 weeks at a time, as I like to move it occasionally, if only to prevent the tyres from developing flat spots and to exercise the parking brake. I also make sure the battery is charged regularly.

If your CRD has been regularly serviced, fluids should be OK. Your battery may have failed if you hadn't driven it very far from where you picked it up. Do you know when it was last replaced?
 

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A couple of things missing here ! Where are you located ? Changing all the fluids is a nice idea , but if you live in a desert , water ain't a problem !...give it a visual inspection , check the fluid levels , tire pressure ect.. and drive it !!
 

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A couple of things missing here ! Where are you located ? Changing all the fluids is a nice idea , but if you live in a desert , water ain't a problem !...give it a visual inspection , check the fluid levels , tire pressure ect.. and drive it !!
Pretty sure there aren't any deserts in England.

I believe it's wet there much of the time, the kind of environment where, if a car is left outside and not brought up to operating temperature regularly, hygroscopic fluids will become saturated with water and lead to corrosion and premature component failure.
 

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Diesel fuel is hygroscopic and it is not a good idea to store a car for any length of time with only a small amount of fuel in the tank as this will ensure a large air/fuel surface area ratio. Hopefully, your recent service will have included a fuel filter change. The CRD fuel filter does not provide a water-in-fuel indicator, nor a water drain valve (contrary to what is described in the Service Manual), so scheduled filter changes are important.
 

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Just for the sake of discussion, you are correct about water absorbtion. BUT we're discussing a car with CLOSED SYSTEMS for fuel, brakes (to a degree),and power steering. He said low mileage , . if the fuel tank cap is missing ..or and cap it missing , then yes , go deeper. It should be noted that if there were any problems the dash lites/ computer systems, would be throwing codes. That final statement was why I said drive it !!
 

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Just for the sake of discussion, you are correct about water absorbtion. BUT we're discussing a car with CLOSED SYSTEMS for fuel, brakes (to a degree),and power steering. He said low mileage , . if the fuel tank cap is missing ..or and cap it missing , then yes , go deeper. It should be noted that if there were any problems the dash lites/ computer systems, would be throwing codes. That final statement was why I said drive it !!
Just for the sake of discussion, these "closed systems" are vented, and they absolutely do absorb water.

I know that he said "low mileage". As I pointed out upthread, a car that is left outside and not brought up to full operating temperature regularly is more likely to have higher levels of moisture in the hygroscopic fluids than one which is driven regularly, because its systems do not reach high enough temperatures for moisture to evaporate or "boil off".

If there's an idiot light, DTC, or other warning system that will tell you when your engine oil, transmission, brake, or any other fluid reaches a specific moisture content on any Chrysler 300, I've never seen or heard of one. In fact, as devilmaycare pointed out, the 300 CRD doesn't even have a water-in-fuel indicator, which have been commonplace on diesels for 40 years or so.

You can believe whatever you like, but for the sake of others who may stumble across this thread, here's an example of just one of the hygroscopic fluids in the OP's car, brake fluid, from Bendix's website:

"However, brake fluid by nature absorbs moisture from the atmosphere through the microscopic pores in brake lines and through the small vent in the reservoir. In fact brake fluid begins to take in moisture the moment you pour it into your braking system.

After a year in service, brake fluid would have absorbed about 2% water and will have progressed to 3% water after only 18 months. These figures would be a lot higher in places that are humid and wet. Moisture in brake fluid decreases its boiling point – 2% water will reduce the brake fluid’s boiling point by 75°C. The boiling point drop becomes more pronounced as more moisture is absorbed.

Moisture contamination heightens the risk of brake failure especially during extreme braking conditions like driving downhill or in constant stop and go in heavy traffic or when carrying heavy loads. Constant braking transmits a lot of heat to the brake fluid from the pads and rotors. If a considerable degree of moisture were present, these would easily boil off and form vapour which is extremely compressible and this is when the pedal starts feeling spongy and the brakes would not apply at all!!"
 
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