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I was wondering if there would be a problem with purchasing a mesh grille for a SRT-8 300C. I really don't like the factory grill or the billet style, however I have been reading about some of engine issues with the 6.1 liter, and was thinking that the mesh styles grilles would not allow the engine to breath properly, thus causing the engine to overheat.
 

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Nah, with an opening that big, there's enough airflow with the mesh grills, if there was a problem with heat, you would see the temp gauge in the car rise above normal.

I don't see any problems with the grill...
 

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HaTaX said:
Nah, with an opening that big, there's enough airflow with the mesh grills, if there was a problem with heat, you would see the temp gauge in the car rise above normal.

I don't see any problems with the grill...
What he said.
 

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bjjones said:
I was wondering if there would be a problem with purchasing a mesh grille for a SRT-8 300C. I really don't like the factory grill or the billet style, however I have been reading about some of engine issues with the 6.1 liter, and was thinking that the mesh styles grilles would not allow the engine to breath properly, thus causing the engine to overheat.

The stock grill let's a good deal of air in. Some of the aftermarket grills are much more restrictive then stock. Then again some might flow better then stock. If you do restrict the flow you might be fine at freeway driving, but you'll definitely have less cooling on steep uphill grades, tight road courses and towing.

Just measuring your engine temp jumping from 200-225 degrees is not always the best indicator of proper airflow. There are many components that need direct airflow cooling that have a much higher MTBF when you increase their operating temperatures. Less cooling to your radiator is also less cooling to your engine, air conditioner, oil cooler, transmission cooler and steering pump. Under hood temps will climb and under hood electronics will also be in a higher temp environment. Today it's expected to be 106 degrees here so it's more of an issue for me then someone that lives in cooler climates.

If I were to buy a aftermarket grill I would make sure it flows at least as well as stock or better.
 

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300C_AWD said:
The stock grill let's a good deal of air in. Some of the aftermarket grills are much more restrictive then stock. Then again some might flow better then stock. If you do restrict the flow you might be fine at freeway driving, but you'll definitely have less cooling on steep uphill grades, tight road courses and towing.

Just measuring your engine temp jumping from 200-225 degrees is not always the best indicator of proper airflow. There are many components that need direct airflow cooling that have a much higher MTBF when you increase their operating temperatures. Less cooling to your radiator is also less cooling to your engine, air conditioner, oil cooler, transmission cooler and steering pump. Under hood temps will climb and under hood electronics will also be in a higher temp environment. Today it's expected to be 106 degrees here so it's more of an issue for me then someone that lives in cooler climates.

what he said..................

If I were to buy a aftermarket grill I would make sure it flows at least as well as stock or better.
:biggrin: :biggrin:
 

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bjjones said:
I was wondering if there would be a problem with purchasing a mesh grille for a SRT-8 300C. I really don't like the factory grill or the billet style, however I have been reading about some of engine issues with the 6.1 liter, and was thinking that the mesh styles grilles would not allow the engine to breath properly, thus causing the engine to overheat.
If nothing else, this will at least give you an idea of what an 'E&G' mesh grill looks like on an 'SRT-8'. Personally, I much prefer the look of the stock OEM grill, and even more so if it was actually chromed. :cool2:

http://www.300cforums.com/gallery/showphoto.php?photo=198&size=big&cat=500&page=30
 

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I wonder if someone will eventually make a chrome grill that looks just like the original...seems like there'd be quite the interest in that.
 

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300sea said:
I wonder if someone will eventually make a chrome grill that looks just like the original...seems like there'd be quite the interest in that.
It can be done, but 'vacuum metalizing' isn't an inexpensive process. :sad:
 

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Well I knew about that, but I was wondering if so many people can make after market grills (mesh and such) for the C, why can't someone fabricate a chrome one that looks like the original instead of having to actually chrome a real original. Seems like it could be done, but I'm far from a pro on the subject :)
 

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On the 300C a high pressure area or (stagnation point) is formed at the point of impact. The point of impact is within the front grill area on the 300C. For proper cooling it should be close to the center of the grill. Those "large" vertical and horizontal slats on the stock grill are there for a protective reasons yet they have a minimal surface area. Using a tight mesh grill seems like it would work as well but it usually it won't. The tighter the mesh the less air that will enter. At the point of impact the air flow is head on. As you move up down or left or right the air flow is angular. If you look at a tight mesh grill from an angle you'll notice that light will be blocked as the angle increases. Air will also tend to roll around a tight mesh grill at these angles.

There are other variables like frontal area, drag coefficient, air velocity, angle of attack, turbulent flow, transitional flow, laminar flow, wake vortices, boundary layer, skin-friction, eddies and air turbulence.

It would be nice if someone designed a aftermarket grill with both increased airflow and better looks in mind. Where the grill was actually flow tested in a wind tunnel.
 

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300C_AWD said:
On the 300C a high pressure area or (stagnation point) is formed at the point of impact. The point of impact is within the front grill area on the 300C. For proper cooling it should be close to the center of the grill. Those "large" vertical and horizontal slats on the stock grill are there for a protective reasons yet they have a minimal surface area. Using a tight mesh grill seems like it would work as well but it usually it won't. The tighter the mesh the less air that will enter. At the point of impact the air flow is head on. As you move up down or left or right the air flow is angular. If you look at a tight mesh grill from an angle you'll notice that light will be blocked as the angle increases. Air will also tend to roll around a tight mesh grill at these angles.

There are other variables like frontal area, drag coefficient, air velocity, angle of attack, turbulent flow, transitional flow, laminar flow, wake vortices, boundary layer, skin-friction, eddies and air turbulence.

It would be nice if someone designed a aftermarket grill with both increased airflow and better looks in mind. Where the grill was actually flow tested in a wind tunnel.
Thanks 300C_AWD. I think you've just help me to hold off on grill mods, at least till we see some airflow comparisons. I was looking at 116 degrees OAT when driving earlier today, and that's relatively cool compared the the 120s and, not infrequently, 130s, we've been looking at all summer here in the Desert Southwest.

I'd about gotten over my initial concerns about reduced airflow with a mesh grille till your comment reinforced it and drove it home.
 

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Meister said:
Thanks 300C_AWD. I think you've just help me to hold off on grill mods, at least till we see some airflow comparisons. I was looking at 116 degrees OAT when driving earlier today, and that's relatively cool compared the the 120s and, not infrequently, 130s, we've been looking at all summer here in the Desert Southwest.

I'd about gotten over my initial concerns about reduced airflow with a mesh grille till your comment reinforced it and drove it home.
Tests could be done with hot wire anemometers and a couple of thermocouples without the need to do wind tunnel tests.

Our engines run really hot as it is. Transmission life expectancy is cut in half for every 10- to 20-degree F increase in fluid temperature. Many chemical reactions tend to double in speed with each 10-degree rise in temperature. The last thing we need is to speed up the aging of the electronics or to half the life of the rubber and plastic under the hood.
 

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this is why i haven't modified my grill either! too hot here in Arizona! I wish i had a exhaust fan under the hood!
 

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For what its worth, it was 109 degrees here today and my temperature didn't go above where it should be. I was driving around most of the day in stop and go traffic, with the a/c on high, obviously.
 

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AZ300C said:
this is why i haven't modified my grill either! too hot here in Arizona! I wish i had a exhaust fan under the hood!
My SRT-8 is at GSM and I'm getting their first Pulse Width Modulator (PMW) controller install for my radiator fans. They worked on it today. Normally the fan Kicks on and off at full speed and the temp jumps up and down from 200-230 F or so every few minutes. You can't just toss in a 180 thermostat as it will throw codes(I'll find a work around soon)

With this unit the fan can be programmed to turn on at any temperature and it ramps up speed the hotter it gets. The advantage is I can pick a operating temperature and keep it there. Since my SRT-8 has a SC in it, I need to keep things cool at the track. I also have a manual bypass switch to run the fans when the car is off so I can get rid of the heat soak between runs. I also have a dual fan back going on the Intercooler heat exchanger with manual bypass.

The 5.7 and 6.1 Hemi's have major heat soak problems at the track. Not just the SC'ed ones. On the road it's no big deal. The 6.1 has large diameter aluminum intake "runners" and copper gaskets. This beast picks up the heat from the block and really heats up the intake charge. 3 bags of ice drops 1/4 mile times 3-4 tenths between runs on hot days. The 5.7 uses a plastic intake and it's specific heat capacity and conduction rate is very low. So it's not near as bad. My concern is that the thin plastic intakes on the 5.7 might not handle the pressure of a SC'ed application a well.
 

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300C_AWD said:
Our engines run really hot as it is. Transmission life expectancy is cut in half for every 10- to 20-degree F increase in fluid temperature.
Would using a synthetic transmission fluid help reduce fluid temperatures?
 
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