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I came down a 10 mile hill that drops 4,000 feet following a string of cars that routinely slowed to 20 mph for various curves. When I arrived at the bottom, my brake pedal took a lot of pressure to stop the car and the pedal pulsed under my foot pressure. When I pulled off, I could smell the brake pads and heat. After restarting, all has gone well in normal travel. The car has about 35,000 on it but the pads are still in acceptable shape according to the state vehicle inspection process that measures them every year.

Is this an indication of some ABS problem or normal for Chrysler brakes?
 

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It sounds to me you may have "cooked" your brake fluid, probably from excessive hard braking. This can cause the fluid to actually boil. This is the reason your brakes felt spongy and hard to stop.

You don't mention if you have aftermarket wheels either. Larger wheels can be hard on brakes due to increased rolling mass and weight. In any case I'd recommend changing the brake fluid, maybe even going to a higher temp spec fluid and even consider braided brake lines especially if you travel that route often.

Bernie
 

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Rambit,

I may have cooked the fluid but my concern was why. This is a state highway used by thousands and the vehicles in front of me were regular rigs and one especially slow 50's farm truck.

I shouldn't think my 2005 would have this reaction to normal downhill brake application.
 

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In cases like that, use your transmission (i.e. downshift) so your brakes don't have to work so hard; you'll get a lot less brake fade. That's why the farm truck had no problem - - he was using his gears, not his brakes, to do most of the work.

Also when you do need the brakes, use them and then get back off, allowing them to cool. Don't just "ride" the brake pedal constantly.

I don't know about the "touring" but I did quite a bit of mountain driving last fall in my "C" and I found the brakes to be more than adequate for the car.
 

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Never had a problem with hills.... I use the engine brake as kevin suggests.

I will say that the brakes weren't up to the Autobahn. A couple of 130-70 MPH brake events and the brakes were toast.... I wish I had my upgraded rotors and pads over there. Maybe even upgraded fluid would've helped.

In your case, I don't see anything out of the ordinary, just follow Kevins suggestion of using the trans gearing/engine brake to slow you down.
 

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I find the brakes on the stock C to be very adequate. I can't speak for the touring or base model (my guess is they have smaller brakes). On the C the fronts are 13.6" on the front with dual pot calipers and 12.6" rears with single pot calipers. They may not be autobahn material (ohhh I bet the SRT8's brakes are!) but they do the job just fine. We also need to keep it in our heads that these cars are HEAVY no matter how you look at it.. Curb weight is around 4100lbs and that's 1K+ more than your typical midsize sedan.

I engine brake all the time and I'm amazed at just how well you can engine brake this car. Heck in second gear off the gas the car will practically come to a stop! :)

My Ram has the same brakes on it, weighs in a 2 thousand plus pounds more, and I tow a 9K boat with my Ram and haven't had any issues! (I engine brake and the trailer has four wheel disk's as well).






I came down a 10 mile hill that drops 4,000 feet following a string of cars that routinely slowed to 20 mph for various curves. When I arrived at the bottom, my brake pedal took a lot of pressure to stop the car and the pedal pulsed under my foot pressure. When I pulled off, I could smell the brake pads and heat. After restarting, all has gone well in normal travel. The car has about 35,000 on it but the pads are still in acceptable shape according to the state vehicle inspection process that measures them every year.

Is this an indication of some ABS problem or normal for Chrysler brakes?
 

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I had the same problem coming down a long hill having to use the brakes hard, and by the time I got to the bottom, and the fade was becoming noticeable. I have a 300C, and recently put on premium brake pads, with slotted/drilled rotor which probably helped with some cooling, but the fade was still noticeble. What kinda success has people had with an upgraded higher temp brake fluid, and what specs did you use. Someone mentioned SS brake lines, how much would that help with the fade under high heat?
 

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Those who do a lot of track racing upgrade both fluid and lines... some even add a cooler.
 

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sorry, but...

Those who do a lot of track racing upgrade both fluid and lines... some even add a cooler.

Ahem, we're talking brakes here. Pretty hard to add a cooler!

Braking difficulties at the outer edge of the performance envelope can be easily altered with upgraded pads. BIG difference in fade resistance.

Braided lines will help pedal feel but do nothing for fading from heat.

The C's brakes are not inadequate, just the wrong pads for performance oriented driving.

(where are you Dave Z?)
 

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Braided lines WILL help with fading from heat. They do not succumb to the same expansion as rubber lines do. It won't stop fade from boiling fluid. Under any more aggressive brake use,you should feel a difference
 

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sorry

Braided lines WILL help with fading from heat. They do not succumb to the same expansion as rubber lines do. It won't stop fade from boiling fluid. Under any more aggressive brake use,you should feel a difference

While there may be an extremely subtle resistance to heat, their improvement is due to resistance to EXPANSION from extreme pressure. A larger difference on some cars than others, as well.

They will do nothing perceptible to stop brake fade, which is caused by the temp of the pads and rotors, not the brake lines. Once you boil the fluid in the calipers, you're done no matter what kind of brake line you use.
 

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I respect your opinion and agree 98%. They will help to a degree in fade. However my experience is on race bikes and not cars. Is there a difference,I surely will not venture an answer or opinion on that. I surely do know they help in the expansion of the lines.I'll have to agree with the pad compound might be more important to resisting fade
 

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so with the respect of the rotors/brake pads and brake fluid heating up, will replacing the pads with say ceramic pad the better way to go, since not much seems to be said about replacing the brake fluid with a different spec. i already have drilled/slotted rotors, so i don't know if much more can be done with that since i have not heard of ceramic rotors for the 300c (unless a complete brake upgrade is done ie. rotor/calipers etc....)
 
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