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Discussion Starter #1
Ok I'll start with this is my LUCK got a divorce 1 month ago and now my car will not start I have a 2007 Chrysler 300C and it all started when my alternator went out I replaced it and the battery and now all of my dash lights are on check engine, battery,brake,ABS,ESP,BAS,And (!) And my front windows don't work,my radio ,blinkers,headlight do not either .does that mean that my ECM is out
 

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Could be a lot of things - you could get a code reader and find out what codes are being thrown, or find a shop you can trust to do that and the work for you.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Have you tried the keydance? Checking For Codes - Doing The "Key Dance"
[/QUOTE
Ok I just did the key dance and it gave me 4 codes U0121
Lost communication with ABS control module
U1110 lost vehicle speed message
PO622 generator field control circuit malfunction
U110A lost communication with SCM(SAS)the power train control module( PCM) doesn't receive steering angle sensor message over the CAN c circuit for 7concetive seconds
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Ok I just did the key dance and it gave me 4 codes U0121
Lost communication with ABS control module
U1110 lost vehicle speed message
PO622 generator field control circuit malfunction
U110A lost communication with SCM(SAS)the power train control module( PCM) doesn't receive steering angle sensor message over the CAN c circuit for 7concetive seconds
So what do I need to do now
 

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Those DTCs are typical of either your CAN bus shutting down completely, or a battery and/or alternator failure. The P0622 failure in particular can be a PCM or alternator failure, but I would suspect the alternator wiring harness or a bad ground.

Based on the history, the first thing I'd do is check to be sure your battery terminals are clean and tight, then check the underhood ground connections and the alternator wiring harness for loose, broken, or corroded connections. If you don't have the skill to do that, take it to whomever replaced the alternator and battery. It's likely to be alternator related, the new alternator might be defective or one of the connections may be bad.

For a down-and-dirty fix, you could try disconnecting the battery for five or ten minutes. That might clear the codes, but unless you find the problem, they'll likely come back.
 

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I would try the battery disconnect first. Give it at least 30 minutes so that the PCM and all modules totally power down.

If the CEL is still on, do the key dance again and record the codes shown again. Then check the connections as @CtCarl suggested plus check your main harness connection to the PCM which is near the firewall on the right side of the vehicle.

There is a fix for the steering angle sensor. Basically you just start the car, turn the wheel to full left lock, then back to full right lock, then do that same process two more times.
 

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Agree with all above.

The "other than battery/alternator" codes aren't that much of an issue, as they always go a bit crazy after battery loss/change; that is, need to be reset. The glove box book says steering has to be re-indexed after battery change.

The fact that you had alternator trouble, the core of your dramas would appear to be still be in that area.

In these cars (apparently, only car I have where I haven't dismantled the alternator YET), the reg isn't in the alt, it is in the car electronics. This means that communication between the alternator and electronics is critical.

On other cars, it is possible to replace alt and it is the reg.... but on these (and given in overall control module); if the reg was faulty, you have to replace entire assy anyway I believe; as reg electronics is within Power control module (PCM).

So - check voltage output to see if Alt is charging at all. If you bring up the EVIC "egg" indications (hold music/compass buttons for ten seconds) and then scroll, two places it shows voltage.

Not to state the obvious - but be very careful when checking alternator connections. The power line to the alternator has battery line voltage at all times, and is a very heavy line. If you short that to anywhere on engine or body, that could cause injury (burns); or could fry electronic units or melt diodes within alt - so do a lot of damage.

The most likely drama is when they replaced the alt; there is a problem with the connectors that run back to the PCM for the reg; so check that first.

Once you get THAT sorted; the other codes can be tackled - and may just "be happy" and disappear.

Haywire voltage supply can cause lots of weird faults - and has to be worked out before all else.

But be careful, as can do more harm than good if not careful.

Good luck.
 
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