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Discussion Starter #21
That looks great Freebird... but I guess I was thinking of returning to stock if I ever sold... or rather if someone else ever sold 'cause I ain't gonna!

Also... if you have any pictures of your solution to the revised e-brake install, I would love to see those. Mine work-around is functional, but not necessary the best looking...
 

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That looks great Freebird... but I guess I was thinking of returning to stock if I ever sold... or rather if someone else ever sold 'cause I ain't gonna!
You could still use the epoxy putty and remove it later on if you desire to return to the stock pedals (rubber pad). You could use a drill bit and drill in a few areas of the putty and it should crack into several pieces, then you can use a flat head to dig the putty pieces out. Then re-install stock rubber brake pad or just leave the putty in the pedal and re-install the stock rubber brake pad over the epoxy putty.

Also... if you have any pictures of your solution to the revised e-brake install, I would love to see those. Mine work-around is functional, but not necessary the best looking
I don't have any pictures GTL. I need to take some more interior pics of the Bee anyways.

But all I did was take a piece of stainless steel that was a bit thinner than the after market e-brake pedal. The stainless is only used to drill through to mount the e-brake pedal and to tack weld to the stock metal e-brake plate. Cut the stainless the same size as the e-brake pedal. Then roll the stainless to fit the curvature of the e-brake pedal. Mount the pedals bolts to the stainless piece.

Below is your picture of the stock e-brake plate. I held the mounted e-brake and stainless piece (now bolted together) over the stock e-brake plate. And marked (scratched) the stock e-brake plate with the backs of the bolts. Your upper left pilot hole in the picture below. I drilled out that hole big enough to get the backside nut that is attached to the e-brake pedal and stainless piece, so it would fit through the hole. I also drilled that hole big enough to allow the lower right boltand nut to slip past the right side of the stock e-brake plate. Then I lined up the e-brake plate and my buddy tack welded the piece to the stock e-brake pedal. I hope this makes sense.

 

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Discussion Starter #23
Thanks for the explanation, but I'm still not sure I comprehend just what you did. If you ever decided to take those pictures, however you choose to do so... that would be great.
 
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