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I was at my dealership of choice (O’Brien Chrysler in Indianapolis) and I went inside to find out what’s the latest news on my replacement Nav system (it broke a month ago). As I was leaving I noticed that there were 5-6 people standing around my car. It was two of the O’Brien’s, the new car sales manager and a few others.

Turns out they thought that my car was another customer whose car had been on the lot for a day or two of repairs. The night before someone came on the lot with a wrecker truck and snatched the car. Luckily the night cleaning crew thought this was odd and called the law. The cops stopped the wrecker two blocks away from the dealership and busted the punks.

The folks at the dealership believe that they picked this car because of the 22” rims. I’m thinking if I have to leave my car I’ll request that they lock it inside overnight. :D
 

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That still won't help much, the reason i'm getting a new car now is because my '95 Lexus GS300 was in the repair shop over the weekend, locked up inside and it was still stolen with the alarm being triggered in the shop at 4am on Memorial Day... That's what insurance is for..... You can't stop thieves, if they want it, they'll get it or at least attempt to.
 

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Find it strange that they would go to all the trouble of using a tow truck to just steal wheels. I would bet it was either slated for a chop shop, of being ferried to a third country. Keep us posted if you hear what your local police have to say if anything. Maybe it's just my suspicious law enforcement background!!!!

By the way thanks for the birthday greeting from the club!!!!!!
 

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This is exactly why I bought a GPS/cellular tracking unit. It's the first thing I will be installing when my car arrives. Lot's of guys use tow trucks when stealing cars. It's easy and doesn't always raise suspicion. At least I'll be alerted if my car starts rolling...

These units can contact you via telephone, e-mail and SMS. Separate alerts are programmed for alarm, tilt, geo-fencing, etc. They also let you remotely track your vehicle, lock/unlock and disable your car. You can control it yourself from the web or your cell phone - you don't have to call in and have police track it for you like LoJack and you don't have to call an operator like OnStar. These are like add-on alarms on steriods.
 

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Anyone see gone in 60 seconds, great movie for car nuts and a pro will get your car if he wants it. John W, I like the ability to disable the car if stolen, who makes the unit you are getting? Without the chip key, the car won't start. Assuming it is loaded on a truck, you could still track it.
 

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II kings 9:20 said:
Anyone see gone in 60 seconds, great movie for car nuts and a pro will get your car if he wants it. John W, I like the ability to disable the car if stolen, who makes the unit you are getting? Without the chip key, the car won't start. Assuming it is loaded on a truck, you could still track it.
The unit I have is by Intertrak. Their website is at http://www.trackmenow.com . To get specs on the hardware and a comparison to other tracking systems, you can go directly to http://www.trackmenow.com/documents.html
Their pricing is pretty fair. Since it is cellular based, you really only pay based on how much you need to use it. There's lots of things you could do with this system.
 

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Any and all of the above can be compromised. I am the po-po. The POLICE for upstanding law bidding folks. Most vehicles are stolen by the kid/CON who installed the security device or one of his friends. I'm sure you left him the key to copy and your home adress on the bill or veh reg in glove box. We are soo trusting. DISCLAMER: crooks already know how, I'm not letting the cat out of the bag, Honest folks that think everthing is ok are the unknowing. Most of the above can compromised very simply. GM's onstar: easy remove external ant. its useless. Wheel locks: 5 pound sledge its done. I can go on and on but many of you will only get mad. Parts are the reason most are stolen. The payoff is huge no Law Enforcement person checks #'s on fenders or even knows where to look. The glass etching you had done or did yourself. Etching: easily removed dremil and stone. Thats it I need another drink! Oh yeah not gonna bother with spell check you feel me ? good knight sleep well.
 

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Smitty brings up very valid points.

Rules I abide by:

I sleep close to my car with a window open.
I always use the incorrect address on any paperwork I fill out for aftermarket work. Car stereo stuff, wheels, tint.
I never give anyone I don't know my full set of keys. Only the car key.
My glovebox is locked with my registration. Last thing I need is some valet driver knowing my home address.

Two of my old roomates cars have been stolen.

The first car was a 2003 Jeep Grand Cherokee. He had it valet parked 10 days after purchasing the car. The spare keys were in his center console complete with alarm remote and dealer ticket still. Valet guy grabbed the spare keys, wrote down our address off the paperwork in the glovebox. He came and silently drove off with a brand new Jeep 2 nights later. No one was ever caught, nor did they find the car. Definitely the roomates fault.

A different roomate at a different place. 1999 Dodge Ram pickup. It is suffering engine trouble and won't start no matter what we do. He has it towed to the dealer by a AAA car club towtruck. Gives the truckdriver the keys to the car and instructs him to drop it off at the dealer. (stupid already) We imagine the towtruck driver drove straight to a locksmith, had the key copied, and then dropped the truck off for repair at the dealer. A week later, truck is repaired and stolen from our driveway. No sign of forced entry and it was pretty obvious who was involved. It was never recovered and Tow truck driver was clean. (I'm sure he had a friend)

In short, trust no one with your car except family and friends. I DO valet my car at some of my favorite restaurants, but I have built relationships with the valet workers and often talk cars with them. I tip heavily. I can only hope it never backfires. ;)
 

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I've always done my own electrical work for alarms, stereos, etc. My GPS tracker is no different. I've already got the unit and I am just awaiting the car. I would never give my car to an alarm shop, that's just like giving them the keys to the castle. Sorry if any of you are in this type of business. I don't mean to offend, but for most of us we don't know the good ones from the bad.

Rogue has good advice. I use my work address or give no address at all instead of my home address (my work has gated parking and security guards - they won't steal it from there.) I also keep my registration and insurance info in a vinyl pouch under the seat or in the rear of the car. If you do this, just make sure you explain to the officer what you're reaching for when you go to get your docs from under the seat.;)

You can't be too careful these days. I'll agree that most people do not take these precautions and could easily be a victim due to their own actions.
 

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Stolen

This isnt the first time ive heard this type of story.
I was at the dealer in Highland Park IL looking at a C but wasnt sure to get it or the Touring. The sales man said they had a T that i could test so he goes in to get the keys and see were the car was. He comes out and starts walking the lot. He says it should be here. We have all the paper and all the keys. It should have been on the lot. I waited for a half HR. Finaly he comes over and says hes sorry but it would seem the car is gone. The Own of the Dealership was furious and called the Cops. Well they got there the only thing they could figure was that it got towed off the lot the night before.

Eric
DLR
 

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One question. Why would anyone leave their registration in the vehicle? If the car is stolen, and the low-life just so happens to have located the reg., they could convince a cop that they are legitamately driving the car.

You should always carry your registration in your wallet.
 

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jeepgrady said:
One question. Why would anyone leave their registration in the vehicle? If the car is stolen, and the low-life just so happens to have located the reg., they could convince a cop that they are legitamately driving the car.

You should always carry your registration in your wallet.
1. The registration does not contain their name. Unless they go out and make a fake ID with my name they are about to be thrown in the back of a cop car.
2. The car is reported stolen.
3. CA registration is about twice the size of my wallet.

:confused:
 

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My salesman said the same thing, I have 4 cars, my wife routinely drives two and occasionally da Hemi. I drive da Hemi and occasionally the other three, this solution is not practical for us unless we were to xerox the registration and what if my wife takes the wrong purse, it all gets very cornfusing. I do carry my house keys on a separate ring in case I get jacked (and live) so they can't just walk in my house (heard that one from an insurance guy). An added benefit is kneecap protection in the event of a head on (heard that from my brother, orthopedic surgeon). SAAB figured this out by putting the ignition b/t the seats, I digress, again. :rolleyes:
 

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I always park by driving into the parking space. Often I park inches from a light post or landscaping planter. Along with this, if I set the parking brake and turn the wheels sharply, to the left or right, would this discourage never-do-wells from attempting to tow away my ride?
 

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JonW said:
I've always done my own electrical work for alarms, stereos, etc. My GPS tracker is no different. I've already got the unit and I am just awaiting the car. I would never give my car to an alarm shop, that's just like giving them the keys to the castle. Sorry if any of you are in this type of business. I don't mean to offend, but for most of us we don't know the good ones from the bad.

Rogue has good advice. I use my work address or give no address at all instead of my home address (my work has gated parking and security guards - they won't steal it from there.) I also keep my registration and insurance info in a vinyl pouch under the seat or in the rear of the car. If you do this, just make sure you explain to the officer what you're reaching for when you go to get your docs from under the seat.;)

You can't be too careful these days. I'll agree that most people do not take these precautions and could easily be a victim due to their own actions.


Makes me glad I live in a tiny town where the cops occasionally check my store to see if it's locked and the pickup truck is king. No chopshops nearby.And valet parking for seafood is paying a buck to park at the fairgrounds during the mullet festival. The "C" is a curiosity, not an object of desire. I will be quite nervous when traveling though.
 

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II kings 9:20, I envy you :) 4 car to choose from?

I guess I would have a couple more if I had space to keep them secure. I was just reading a newspaper article about a business over here which charges $55 a week to store a car. They have a live on site caretaker and a rolling road to circulate the juices once a week. For an extra $30 a week the will store the car in a sealed dehumidified bubble.

A good option if you only want to drive your beast occasionally.
 
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