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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
For those that have done the strut tower brace on the 2012/13 SRT8 what has been your experience? There are responses on the first generation SRT8 but I did not find any for the second generation.

Is the mod worth it?
 

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It really doesn't matter which generation, or brand car for that matter, a strut tower brace is a good addition for better handling. Just FYI, your strut towers will look a lot like my strut strut towers. No significant difference and the result will be much the same on your car as it was on my car.
 

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But it will... LOOK cool! :) I think it makes the engine bay look sharp!
 

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Here's what mine looks like on a 2012.





 

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Ahhhh... Dizznam!!! I'm biting your SRT badge on the strut bar!!! That looks Supa clean!!!
Thanks. I thought it would be a nice touch instead of the standard Mopar.

That looks great, JonW. Did you notice a difference after you put that one on?
Definitely. Between lowering and the strut bar, there is no roll at all when taking corners. Even without lowering, the strut bar helps stiffen the front end.
 

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Correct me if I'm wrong, but don't the 1st gen STB also fit on the 2nd gen?
 
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I think the only one you have to watch for is the Razors Edge where it replaces the factory support bar for the windshield wiper motor.
 

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Keep in mind that the braces that bolt into the firewall are more functional. (Some will say they are the only ones that are functional)
 
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So the bolt in are more functional meaning work better than without? Also how easy/hard are these to bolt to the firewall, what do they bolt to?

Lastly are they're any better than others? I won't be doing any racing but will have my engine dressed up before too long, and like the look!

Thanks much! :biggthump


Keep in mind that the braces that bolt into the firewall are more functional. (Some will say they are the only ones that are functional)
 

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So the bolt in are more functional meaning work better than without? Also how easy/hard are these to bolt to the firewall, what do they bolt to?

Lastly are they're any better than others? I won't be doing any racing but will have my engine dressed up before too long, and like the look!

Thanks much! :biggthump
Yes, those that bolt to the cowl bracing (in answer to your second question) are more functional as they now have a triangular series of connections vs. a simple arch between the two strut towers.

The better ones triangulate vs. provide a simple arch. Even for general handling they are a very nice upgrade, tying the two towers together.

On our cars, the entire vertical suspension load is transmitted to the top of the vehicle's strut tower. In general terms, a strut tower in a monocoque chassis is a reinforced portion of the inner wheel well and is not necessarily directly connected to the main chassis rails. For this reason there is inherent flex within the strut towers relative to the chassis rails.

A strut bar is designed to reduce this strut tower flex by tying two parallel strut towers together. This transmits the load of each strut tower during cornering which ties the two towers together and reduces chassis flex. To accomplish this effectively the bar must be rigid throughout its length.

Mine was made by a company who is no longer in business but it does the job perfectly. I love how well my car corners with the improved front wheels tracking together through a curve without one side unloading on a bump and causing the steering or front end to kickout and understeer.

Get one!
 

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Thank you Sir, much appreciated!

Couple of questions:

So I've seen the regular Mopar bar installed (not to the firewall) on Youtube and looks pretty straight forward. As for bolting to the firewall is it a fairly easy process? I've read that the car needs to be lifted off of the suspension (meaning on a lift) to install, although the install on the vid they did not do that. Is that because it was not bolted to the firewall?

Second, is this a viable option without installing coilovers, and just installing the bar?

Thanks again,
Ed



Yes, those that bolt to the cowl bracing (in answer to your second question) are more functional as they now have a triangular series of connections vs. a simple arch between the two strut towers.

The better ones triangulate vs. provide a simple arch. Even for general handling they are a very nice upgrade, tying the two towers together.

On our cars, the entire vertical suspension load is transmitted to the top of the vehicle's strut tower. In general terms, a strut tower in a monocoque chassis is a reinforced portion of the inner wheel well and is not necessarily directly connected to the main chassis rails. For this reason there is inherent flex within the strut towers relative to the chassis rails.

A strut bar is designed to reduce this strut tower flex by tying two parallel strut towers together. This transmits the load of each strut tower during cornering which ties the two towers together and reduces chassis flex. To accomplish this effectively the bar must be rigid throughout its length.

Mine was made by a company who is no longer in business but it does the job perfectly. I love how well my car corners with the improved front wheels tracking together through a curve without one side unloading on a bump and causing the steering or front end to kickout and understeer.

Get one!
 

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Bolting to the cowl support (not the firewall) is not hard. You mock up the bar where it will sit, mark the holes and drill. The hardest part is getting to the nut on the backside to fasten it in place.

Here's my kit. You'll see the bar, triangle connectors and some end supports for the triangle to cowl brace connection.



I wasn't going to do red and aluminum so I had the braces and supports powdercoated in black and the bar done in silvervein to match my wheels and some other pieces under the hood.



Here you can see the strut connector, the triangle to cowl brace connection and the bar bolted to the top of it. This kit ties not only the tops of the strut towers together, it also provided additional strength and stability by tying the towers to a rigid body component.





You don't need to unload the suspension to install this. I would recommend you not unload the suspension. Have the car sitting on the suspension, on a hard flat surface, to insure that one strut is not compressed or unloaded more than any other. You do want the car fairly level.

You don't need coilovers to put on the bar as it will work with stock struts or coilovers in the same manner. I just happen to have coilovers on my car but I did that for other reasons, specifically to lower the car and improve handling. I also have larger front and rear swaybars, again for the handling improvement.
 

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Excellent, great info.

The only other thing is my car has the 5.7, I'm assuming it's the same concept with a diff bar?

Thanks!


Bolting to the cowl support (not the firewall) is not hard. You mock up the bar where it will sit, mark the holes and drill. The hardest part is getting to the nut on the backside to fasten it in place.

Here's my kit. You'll see the bar, triangle connectors and some end supports for the triangle to cowl brace connection.



I wasn't going to do red and aluminum so I had the braces and supports powdercoated in black and the bar done in silvervein to match my wheels and some other pieces under the hood.



Here you can see the strut connector, the triangle to cowl brace connection and the bar bolted to the top of it. This kit ties not only the tops of the strut towers together, it also provided additional strength and stability by tying the towers to a rigid body component.





You don't need to unload the suspension to install this. I would recommend you not unload the suspension. Have the car sitting on the suspension, on a hard flat surface, to insure that one strut is not compressed or unloaded more than any other. You do want the car fairly level.

You don't need coilovers to put on the bar as it will work with stock struts or coilovers in the same manner. I just happen to have coilovers on my car but I did that for other reasons, specifically to lower the car and improve handling. I also have larger front and rear swaybars, again for the handling improvement.
 

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Absolutely the same concept. I don't know if the dimensions are the same from the strut tower tops to the cowl brace or if the distance between the towers is the same but just make sure you get a kit to fit a 2nd Gen car.

The bar I have was designed to clear the stock 6.1L intake manifold or the supercharger of my choice.
 

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Great will do!

This just looks A LOT diff than yours...cause it is I know.

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Absolutely the same concept. I don't know if the dimensions are the same from the strut tower tops to the cowl brace or if the distance between the towers is the same but just make sure you get a kit to fit a 2nd Gen car.

The bar I have was designed to clear the stock 6.1L intake manifold or the supercharger of my choice.
 
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