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Hi there!
I don`t know if this is a problem or not, but here I´m trying to find it out. I have 2006 model 300C HEMI and I have noticed two things with my transmission.

First; when the the engine is cold and its cold winter time (below 0 celsius), the transmission seems to slide and run the rpms quite high before shifting the gear. This problem disappears after 2-3 minutes driving.

Second; still after about 10-15 minutes "easy" driving (when the transmission oil should be warm enough?), if I kick-down the transmission the shifting is quite rough. After doing this 2-3 times, the kick-down comes to "normal" smooth shifting.

So, are this things normal (due to the warming of transmission oil) or are they signs of possible transmission problems?

The car is 33000 km old, and just been in dealers official 30000 km service.

Thanks for help!
 

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Most probable cause is low fluid level. Get yourself the Miiler 9336 special tool dip stick and check it .30mm cold,50 mm warm, 80 mm hot fluid.
 

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Hi there!
I don`t know if this is a problem or not, but here I´m trying to find it out. I have 2006 model 300C HEMI and I have noticed two things with my transmission.

First; when the the engine is cold and its cold winter time (below 0 celsius), the transmission seems to slide and run the rpms quite high before shifting the gear. This problem disappears after 2-3 minutes driving.

Second; still after about 10-15 minutes "easy" driving (when the transmission oil should be warm enough?), if I kick-down the transmission the shifting is quite rough. After doing this 2-3 times, the kick-down comes to "normal" smooth shifting.

So, are this things normal (due to the warming of transmission oil) or are they signs of possible transmission problems?

The car is 33000 km old, and just been in dealers official 30000 km service.

Thanks for help!
Have you ever noticed a pool of fluid under your car? Has it had the O-Ring TSB fix done to it? Have you ever had a shudder?

I know all I have is questions, but there are a few well known common problems with easy fixes.

You may very well be low on fluid and the only way to find out is to buy the Miller tool or have your dealer check the level. That would most likely be caused by the O-Ring leak. There's also been some cases of the pan gasket leaking.

If you've had problems with a shudder that may be caused by water getting in around where the filler tube is. The fix for that is a new torque converter and flush.

Bernie
 

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Hi there!


First; when the the engine is cold and its cold winter time (below 0 celsius), the transmission seems to slide and run the rpms quite high before shifting the gear. This problem disappears after 2-3 minutes driving.

Second; still after about 10-15 minutes "easy" driving (when the transmission oil should be warm enough?), if I kick-down the transmission the shifting is quite rough. After doing this 2-3 times, the kick-down comes to "normal" smooth shifting.

!
The higher RPM shifts in cold weather is normal. A lot of folks wish the car always shifted the way it does in the morning.

The second issue, rough shifting, I don't think is normal or common.
Probably worth a visit to the dealer. If you complain about the tranny they will probably flash your TCM and PCM, which might fix the shifting problem.
 

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Anyone point me in the right direction for this "Miller" dipstick please? Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
The higher RPM shifts in cold weather is normal. A lot of folks wish the car always shifted the way it does in the morning.

The second issue, rough shifting, I don't think is normal or common.
Probably worth a visit to the dealer. If you complain about the tranny they will probably flash your TCM and PCM, which might fix the shifting problem.
Thanks for the hints, I will visit my dealer to check this out!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
The higher RPM shifts in cold weather is normal. A lot of folks wish the car always shifted the way it does in the morning.

The second issue, rough shifting, I don't think is normal or common.
Probably worth a visit to the dealer. If you complain about the tranny they will probably flash your TCM and PCM, which might fix the shifting problem.
Thanks, I will visit the dealer!
 

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Anyone point me in the right direction for this "Miller" dipstick please? Thanks.
You can go directly to the manufacturer and skip Wykoff Chrysler or any other middleman:

SPX Miller Special Tools

There doesn't appear to be a way to order online but there is a toll free phone number. I work at an auto parts store and have ordered through them, but they will sell to anyone at the same price. should be a matter of days (shipping time) not a matter of weeks. Wycoff is just ordering them in as they get orders and then re-shipping them.


SPX makes all of Chrysler's special tools under the "miller" name, Ford's specialty tools under the "OTC" name, and GM's special tools (all those tools with the "J" in front of the number in the GM shop manuals) under the "Kent-Moore" name.
 

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Any idea how much they are there Keven? I've been thinking of getting one myself.

Bernie
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thanks, I will visit the dealer!
Hi folks,
thanks to your advices, I started to follow a possible transmission oil leak during the weekend. And guess what, in the morning there was a small pool of red fluid under my car. So you were quite right. This morning I drove the car to the local dealer and they promised to check it (and fix if possible) during the day. So hopefully the lack of oil doesn`t yet have "destroyed" the transmission.
:smashfrea
 

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Any idea how much they are there Keven? I've been thinking of getting one myself.

Bernie
No I don't; you just have to call the toll free number.

There's another option Bernie that will save you money but you have to know that your fluid level is correct at the present time (i.e. no leaks or any reason to think it is low).

I'm pretty sure you have NAPA in Canada don't you? Not sure if they go under a different name up there.... but anyway I purchased a universal dipstick, NAPA part number 813-5113 (about $12 U.S.) when my car was new, and then I marked the "full cold" and "Full Hot" fluid levels on the dipstick with a center punch. There's an adjustable "collar" on the handle end that is secured by a set screw so you can adjust the effective length of the dipstick. With the trans cold (before you start it in the morning) just insert the dipstick all the way until you feel it bottom out, slide the collar down aganist the dipstick tube and tighten the set screw. Then pull the dipstick out and mark the fluid level with a center punch. This is your "full cold" level. Now go drive the car until the transmission is at normal operating tempurature, and (with the car running in park) re-insert the dipstick and mark the fluid level again; this is your "full hot" mark and will be higher on the stick than the "cold" mark.

I don't see any reason this won't work as long as you mark the dipstick before you have a leak or drain your fluid. Only problem is the overall length of the dipstick prevents it from being left in place; I re-installed the little plastic plug thingy and hung my "special tool" on a nail in the garage next to the car.
 

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How are you measuring the tempture when you are testing the levels? when I had my tansmission replaced at an independant shop The owner showed me the graph with ranges of acceptable levels because he couldnt believe how complicated it was.

Unless he was blowing smoke I got the feeling that the old fashioned dipstick cant be used any more.
 

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How are you measuring the tempture when you are testing the levels? when I had my tansmission replaced at an independant shop The owner showed me the graph with ranges of acceptable levels because he couldnt believe how complicated it was.

Unless he was blowing smoke I got the feeling that the old fashioned dipstick cant be used any more.
This graph will give you an idea of how temperature sensitive it is.



Bernie
 

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Common sense ,hot tranny fluid expands. measure 30mm cold ,50mm warm, 80 mm hot.Just like trans dip sticks have been for years.You can find the chart in the service manual, or on some other posts on this forum but exact temp is not needed , just check cold, drive car 15 min check warm, drive on highway another 15 min check hot. As long as your within 30mm to 80 mm cold to hot your tranny fluid is OK.This practice fits most cars on the road today.If you have a scan tool (not simple code reader) you can get the exact trans temp (when car is in gear) to match up to chart. Using this above method is better than doing nothing and driving with low fluid.It is needed for do it yourselfers if you change your own fluid.These tranny's use ATF-4 fluid by Mopar or Valvoline, which is Chrysler approved. Do not use universal fluid, which many independant shops have in their flushing machine. ASK for ATF-4.
 

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Common sense ,hot tranny fluid expands. measure 30mm cold ,50mm warm, 80 mm hot.Just like trans dip sticks have been for years.You can find the chart in the service manual, or on some other posts on this forum but exact temp is not needed , just check cold, drive car 15 min check warm, drive on highway another 15 min check hot. As long as your within 30mm to 80 mm cold to hot your tranny fluid is OK.This practice fits most cars on the road today.If you have a scan tool (not simple code reader) you can get the exact trans temp (when car is in gear) to match up to chart. Using this above method is better than doing nothing and driving with low fluid.It is needed for do it yourselfers if you change your own fluid.These tranny's use ATF-4 fluid by Mopar or Valvoline, which is Chrysler approved. Do not use universal fluid, which many independant shops have in their flushing machine. ASK for ATF-4.
Can't argue with you there for sure. It's always been like that, but we've had to rely on a "hot" mark on a dipstick in the past.

It's equally as bad to overfill it too:

EFFECTS OF INCORRECT FLUID LEVEL
A low fluid level allows the pump to take in air along with the fluid. Air in the fluid will cause fluid pressures to be low and develop slower than normal. If the transmission is overfilled, the gears churn the fluid into foam. This aerates the fluid and causing the same conditions occurring with a low level. In either case, air bubbles cause fluid overheating, oxidation, and varnish buildup which interferes with valve and clutch operation. Foaming also causes fluid expansion which can result in fluid overflow from the transmission vent or fill tube. Fluid overflow can easily be mistaken for a leak if inspection is not careful.

I just wanted to point out that it's ATF+4 only so some who may be looking for it don't get confused looking for -4 figuring it may be different.

Bernie
 

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Again my point is, for do it yourselfers buy the dip stick and check the trans fluid every oil change.You will learn the range in milli metters on the dip stick if you have no leaks.If you never checked trans fluid on any of your previous cars then dont get the dip stick. You will leave it up to the dealer to check it only after you complain about a tranny problem.I dont think they check it or all the other things they say thay check at every maintenance. The dealers intrest is to make money on trans fluid replacement or even total trans replacement after the warrenty is over.My intrest is PRENTATIVE MAINTENANCE on my expensive investment.
 

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Another helpful hint,07 and 08 cars have a temperature bypass valve in the tranny cooler line, which (like a thermostat) keep the tranns fluid at 160 F or higher.After 1/2 hour drive, some highway speeds ,tranny temps would be in the 160 - 180 f range .Use your dip stick and measure . 65 mm to 70 mm ,tranny level O.K. In eairler posts i say up to 80 mm is O. K, this is after measuring in summertime 90 F temps or after some hard driving maybe at the track which would bring trans temps up to 200 f. Under standing Rambit's post as over fill is no good also again i say 30 cold to 70 mm hot fluid o.k. 80 mm hot ok certain conditions apply(90F TEMPS)
 
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