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Hi Phil my experience may not be generally applicable since I deliberately bought a buggered 300C but here is what I have learned over the past few months:

The 300C is a fairly simple beast in V8 form. I think the usual caveats should apply to a turbo diesel in that parts are always more expensive and diesels are incredibly reliable right up to when they are not, and the bills can be really bad. I personally avoid 2nd hand turbo diesels of anything for this reason. I would want a rock solid service history.

Don't know much about the petrol sixes, other than that if you are buying a 300 the V8 is more desirable for obvious reasons.

The Hemi V8...is sublime. However they do seem quite fragile in the face of monstrous abuse like anything else. They seem to need very specific oils and coolants. They are not bulletproof although they are dead simple to work on.

Look for general signs of abuse: bad looking wiring, dirty oil, coolant that isn't clean. The general state of the engine bay will tell you a lot. Oil leaks or coolant leaks budget for repairs. The V8 will run badly with any crankcase air leaks so any leak needs fixing ASAP.

Transmissions I have no experience with. They seem robust looking at the forum posts.

The bodies look pretty robust but they will rust if not repaired properly. Look in the usual spots for accident damage i.e. around the corners of the bonnet and boot. Any over spray around repairs is a sign the job might have been a bad one. I have surface rust in my spare tyre well, any car in the UK could be well rusted there.

Suspension is a big issue it seems. Its a big, heavy car and the suspension bushes are not up to high mileages. Most suspension work looks easy but getting parts can be time consuming. Listen out for knocks and groans in the front suspension and budget on 3-400 pounds per corner if it is really bad.

The interiors seem OK, not too fragile although the leather is pretty typical for Chrysler in that it does dry out and rip. New covers can be purchased pretty cheaply and replacing them is simple. Make sure the parking brake works and every handle and button is present and does something.

My paint has serious problems with clear coat failing, a black car in Australia this is expected I guess but not cheap to fix.

In short: nothing extraordinary about the 300 you need to look for compared to other cars except the front suspension. Find the lowest mileage, best serviced car you can afford. The V8 versions are more desireable IMHO but your circumstances will dictate which one appeals to you more.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hi Phil my experience may not be generally applicable since I deliberately bought a buggered 300C but here is what I have learned over the past few months:

The 300C is a fairly simple beast in V8 form. I think the usual caveats should apply to a turbo diesel in that parts are always more expensive and diesels are incredibly reliable right up to when they are not, and the bills can be really bad. I personally avoid 2nd hand turbo diesels of anything for this reason. I would want a rock solid service history.

Don't know much about the petrol sixes, other than that if you are buying a 300 the V8 is more desirable for obvious reasons.

The Hemi V8...is sublime. However they do seem quite fragile in the face of monstrous abuse like anything else. They seem to need very specific oils and coolants. They are not bulletproof although they are dead simple to work on.

Look for general signs of abuse: bad looking wiring, dirty oil, coolant that isn't clean. The general state of the engine bay will tell you a lot. Oil leaks or coolant leaks budget for repairs. The V8 will run badly with any crankcase air leaks so any leak needs fixing ASAP.

Transmissions I have no experience with. They seem robust looking at the forum posts.

The bodies look pretty robust but they will rust if not repaired properly. Look in the usual spots for accident damage i.e. around the corners of the bonnet and boot. Any over spray around repairs is a sign the job might have been a bad one. I have surface rust in my spare tyre well, any car in the UK could be well rusted there.

Suspension is a big issue it seems. Its a big, heavy car and the suspension bushes are not up to high mileages. Most suspension work looks easy but getting parts can be time consuming. Listen out for knocks and groans in the front suspension and budget on 3-400 pounds per corner if it is really bad.

The interiors seem OK, not too fragile although the leather is pretty typical for Chrysler in that it does dry out and rip. New covers can be purchased pretty cheaply and replacing them is simple. Make sure the parking brake works and every handle and button is present and does something.

My paint has serious problems with clear coat failing, a black car in Australia this is expected I guess but not cheap to fix.

In short: nothing extraordinary about the 300 you need to look for compared to other cars except the front suspension. Find the lowest mileage, best serviced car you can afford. The V8 versions are more desireable IMHO but your circumstances will dictate which one appeals to you more.
Thanks very much for your very thorough reply it gives me a lot of info to look out for I will have to keep to the diesel for cost alone but know a bit about what to look for due to my son having owned Mercedes thanks again for your help hope I find a good one soon 🙂
 

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Hi there. As above, all good advise. I will add that the gen1 is now 'getting on a bit' and there are quite a few poorly maintained examples for sale, usually privately. Try to avoid those and if you can, buy from a fairly reputable auto sales centre so you get at least a 3 or preferably a 6 month warranty. Ideally, go for a newer gen2 (2012+) model which I think is a significant improvement over the gen1. I was fortunate enough to buy my car from a Ford dealership who had taken it in a px deal. It came with a 12 month warranty as standard.
As far as the engine is concerned, look for the usual oil leaks, especially around the turbo / manifold area and the exhaust on cold start up.
If the car has not had any suspension refresh / replacement, it will start playing up, sooner or later - best thing to do is to change all the tension struts / control arms / ball joints / links in one hit. This is not as bad as you would think, and once done, should give you trouble free motoring for quite some time.
Parts can be bought at agreeable prices if you shop around online. I tend to find most parts on fleabay.
Electrics can / will be a problem so ensure all functions / features work as they should, things like active collision warning and blind spot monitoring (on gen2).
All in all, a very nice (and different) car to have. Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Hi there. As above, all good advise. I will add that the gen1 is now 'getting on a bit' and there are quite a few poorly maintained examples for sale, usually privately. Try to avoid those and if you can, buy from a fairly reputable auto sales centre so you get at least a 3 or preferably a 6 month warranty. Ideally, go for a newer gen2 (2012+) model which I think is a significant improvement over the gen1. I was fortunate enough to buy my car from a Ford dealership who had taken it in a px deal. It came with a 12 month warranty as standard.
As far as the engine is concerned, look for the usual oil leaks, especially around the turbo / manifold area and the exhaust on cold start up.
If the car has not had any suspension refresh / replacement, it will start playing up, sooner or later - best thing to do is to change all the tension struts / control arms / ball joints / links in one hit. This is not as bad as you would think, and once done, should give you trouble free motoring for quite some time.
Parts can be bought at agreeable prices if you shop around online. I tend to find most parts on fleabay.
Electrics can / will be a problem so ensure all functions / features work as they should, things like active collision warning and blind spot monitoring (on gen2).
All in all, a very nice (and different) car to have. Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks very much for your input I agree with you a 12 month warranty would be a good safeguard ile try and look at that point and I agree they are a very different car don’t see to many in my areas Manchester uk ile keep on looking with a Lott more ideas now I’ve joined this group so thanks again for all the good advice 🙂
 

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Hi want to buy a used 300c but worried about cost of running one maintenance ext not mechanical myself ime retired any advice will be welcome thanks I live in the uk
Some things to consider when owning a used Chrysler 300c include:
  1. Regular Maintenance: Be prepared for regular maintenance costs such as oil changes, tire rotations, and brake pad replacements.
  2. Mechanical Repairs: Luxury vehicles can be more expensive to repair when something goes wrong, so make sure you budget for unexpected repairs.
  3. Insurance: Insurance costs for luxury vehicles can be higher than for standard cars.
  4. Fuel consumption: The Chrysler 300c is a large car with a V6 or V8 engine, so it will likely have higher fuel consumption than a smaller car.
  5. Warranty: Find out if the car you're interested in still have warranty and what does it covers, if not, you can consider an aftermarket warranty.
That being said, if you're retired and looking for a car that you can enjoy driving, the Chrysler 300c could be a great choice for you. If you decide to buy one, I recommend finding one on Abetter.Bid. Additionally, it's important to research and compare the costs of maintaining and operating a Chrysler 300c with those of other vehicles you may be considering.
 
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