Chrysler 300C & SRT8 Forums banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I have a black 2014 Chrysler 300 base model. With the snow that has hit us, I noticed some minor scratches above the driver side window from the snow brush I used just (No idea how i did this, stupid I know). Now I was wondering, once spring hits, should I use a black wax (for example Turtle Wax Black Box) to fill the scratches and another wax (Meguiar's Ultimate Paste Wax) to protect the black wax? Is this overkill to do?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
553 Posts
I have a black 2014 Chrysler 300 base model. With the snow that has hit us, I noticed some minor scratches above the driver side window from the snow brush I used just (No idea how i did this, stupid I know). Now I was wondering, once spring hits, should I use a black wax (for example Turtle Wax Black Box) to fill the scratches and another wax (Meguiar's Ultimate Paste Wax) to protect the black wax? Is this overkill to do?
I say go for it.


...just make sure Bif doesn't try to con you and tell you he's just finishing the second coat... ::wink::
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
421 Posts
My detail guy uses a "glaze" followed by a good quality wax. Looks great.

Don't as k me what exactly Glaze is but it seems to work. My car is black as well.

As required, every year to 18 months, he clays the finish prior to glaze.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
159 Posts
Depends what you want to do and what your budget is. Glazing products contains oils that mask or fill in fine scratches, so while you're not doing anything to remove the scratch from the clear coat, you'll be hiding it for a period of time until the oils breakdown. I never really fell for those "black" only waxes. I have used a lot of LSP products and my favorites are Wolfgang Fuzion (little pricey, lower durability, looks awesome, great beading) for spring/summer and Collinite 845 (awesome durability, economical, looks pretty good, great beading) for winter months.

You have two options really;

1.) Mask scratches with glaze and apply LSP of your choice
2.) Remove scratches via polishing and apply LSP of your choice

Both have their pros/cons. It really comes down to personal preference.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
95 Posts
What I do at work is if its a small enough scratch glaze can take it out but from the sound of it I would use a 3m rubbing compound to get the scratch out and go back over it with the glaze, If that does not work you might want to get some 2000 grit wet sand paper then use the compound then go over it with glaze. Only thing the black wax will do is fill in the scratch then over time with car washes you will notice the scratch. Hope this helps.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
421 Posts
The trick is to avoid scratches in the first place. We have all seen relatively new cars with finishes ruined by over ambitious pursuit of the perfect blemish free shine.

If you keep getting objectionable scratches/blemishes and you keep going at them with abrasive stuff on power buffers/applicators, etc. - well you are going to get trouble you can't fix short of a new paint job.

Mind you, this is not a criticism of car detailers. Rather a warning to owners with that maniacal drive for the perfect finish coupled with bad car care habits, ie: mechanical car washes, outside parking, accumulated grit/dirt/tree sap/insects, etc.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top